Olafur Eliasson

Water covers 70 per cent of the earth's surface. "It's always the same and it's never the same," says Finnish artist Elina
Katharina Grosse, Rockaway!, site-specific installation. Courtesy the artist and MoMA PS1. Photo: Pablo Enriquez. Calder
What is a mentor? A teacher? A protector? A guide? A master? An editor? A coach? A fresh eye? All these things. The 2015 class of Rolex artistic protégés will remember what their distinguished mentors have taught them: To trust themselves. To be fearless. To get joy from difficulty. To bring narrative to a project. To rehearse in a hallway for three days and not be afraid. To juggle. To avoid being academic or theoretical. To become more "wild". To work hard. To question their identity. To use all five senses. To learn that to be an artist is a solitary journey, most often a frightening one.
There's nothing like watching chunks of glacier melt before your eyes to bring the reality of Climate Change home. According
Thanks to artist Olafur Eliasson, French citizens are confronting climate change too.
From the historical to the contemporary, from city centers to the far-flung reaches of the Arctic Circle, there is an abundance of events and exhibitions drawing art lovers to the northernmost reaches of Europe.
From a distance Cirkelbroen (circle bridge) on Christianshavns canal in Copenhagen, Denmark, takes on the guise of illuminated
It seems to be an unofficial rule of the modern art fair that sooner or later they are obliged to transcend their creative and physical boundaries and expand beyond their original brief and location.
What Eliasson suggests is a transformation of the way we observe reality, a becoming aware of our prejudices and conditioners to open to another way of relating to it.
Eliasson’s theoretical grounding runs deep, and his lens is global, but his work manifests locally and simply. It moves the