old havana

Wandering the streets of Old Havana is like walking through a dilapidated version of the 1950’s. It’s true, the old Detroit
The architecture of Old Havana has lasted hundreds of years, but will it survive the onslaught of tourists and rampart commercialism that so despoils other Latin American capitals?
I was in Havana, Cuba, with no visa and no permission from the U.S. government. It was just the way I wanted it.
Fusterlandia is a definite must see on any sojourn to Havana. The Cuban artist has energized his community, inspiring them to create art on their own homes, and thus his vision has aesthetically inspired this part of Havana.
I love to stumble across these facades and see their occupants looking out from the small balconies. There is something in them, in the paint chosen to cover the walls and in the bell hanging over the door that gives me hope.
There is a certain wisp of aesthetic beauty in abandonment. Dilapidated cities are like artistically abstracted urban zones, defined by crumbling walls, elegantly decrepit doors and defaced buildings.
The mid-century Pontiacs and Plymouths, painted in pulsating colors, patched together with wire and wishes. This is Havana.