Older Americans Act

A new campaign aims to bring more attention to the issue.
Since 1963, May has been Older Americans Month, a time to celebrate seniors and the anniversary of the Older Americans Act, which helps millions of people every year.
We are in the midst of an age wave, brought on by baby boomers who are changing the nation's demographics and redefining the meaning of old age.
We as a society need to go long on one especially critical issue that we seem to be in political and policy denial about -- the need for long-term services and federal policies which promote them.
This week, September 28-October 2, 2015, is Malnutrition Awareness Week. It is an opportunity to spotlight a growing but under-recognized problem facing older adults in America: the hidden epidemic of malnutrition.
As established in 1963 by President John F. Kennedy, May is designated as Older Americans Month in the United States. The month provides an excellent opportunity to celebrate this Nation's older adults and our programs that are working.
A lot of appropriate attention is focused on hunger and food insecurity as well as obesity. However, malnutrition, also known as undernutrition, is a bigger threat because of the deeper health consequences it creates.
As Congress prepares to move its own budget process, it should embrace those proposals that constitute sound investments as compared to just expenditures. Older adults are an important resource to their families, their communities and their nation.
As 2014 comes to a close, we look ahead to 2015 with great anticipation and a multitude of opportunities to disrupt aging. Next year marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid and the Older Americans Act. It also is the 80th anniversary of Social Security.
This particular measure, which usually takes a back seat to the official poverty rate in the news and media reports, paints a far more realistic portrait of what seniors in America are really experiencing.
The American public's cynicism about Washington can diminish when bipartisanship prevails and bills become law. The most recent example of this was the signing into law of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act by President Obama yesterday, July 22.
The Ryan path devastates programs that now help millions of seniors stay out of poverty. It would tip the balance in the wrong direction for too many of our elders who struggle daily to make ends meet.
The federal Administration on Aging partners with more than 600 local agencies to distribute meals and other services to
"I thought about it for two or three days and I said, 'right now my health's pretty good,' and so I just gave it up," he
To be lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender, and to age into a system that offers marginal support for dealing with the consequences of discrimination, is a harsh reality for millions of LGBT older Americans.
How can we help our nation's seniors and their families even more? How can we make the Older Americans Act even better? For me, the answer is to make economic security part of the Older Americans Act.
Last week, nearly 200 Goodwill employees lobbied on Capitol Hill on behalf of people who have a great need for job training