on-demand economy

All this discussion of our current "gig" economy has probably got Jelly Roll Morton, Charlie Parker, and every other pre-sixties jazz musician rolling in their graves. I can hear them bellyaching: 'A gig economy? There ain't enough nightclubs to support that many gigs!'
At the same time cooks and cashiers are winning huge wage increases from coast to coast, regulators and policymakers have seemed willing to let behemoths like Uber off the hook, resulting in paltry pay for the folks who are literally driving the "new economy."
One of the great perplexities of the current labor market in the US--and many other countries around the world--is the "mismatch
3. Know that it will become hard, the nature of the problems will change and the stakes will become bigger. "Growing a business
If you thought comparison shopping was hard with traditional travel companies, just try the sharing economy. Lightly regulated companies such as Airbnb and Uber can make it as difficult as traditional travel sites -- and sometimes even harder -- to determine the final price you'll pay, let alone compare prices on other forms of transportation or accommodations.
If you thought comparison shopping was hard with traditional travel companies, just try the sharing economy. Lightly regulated
The latest Labor Department numbers are in, and they confirm the health of the labor market. Impressively, initial jobless
As on-demand companies like Uber and Instacart find savvy ways to navigate employment law, the misclassification of employees as independent contractors allows them to maximize profits at their workers' expense.
A new paper argues it would be a big mistake to declare them anything but traditional workers.