only children

Parents who have one kid at home say it's easier in many ways, and way harder in others.
"If you ever wonder what being an only child is like, just imagine third wheeling your parents every day."
I am an only child. Through the years I have been asked if I felt differently because I am an only child. My answer was always no because that is all I have ever known.
This topic is close to my heart because I am an only child and struggled with feeling lonely. Unlike your daughter, I was very shy and so would never have just run over to another child's house to hang out. It is great that your daughter is extroverted, and I understand that you are anxious that her spirit and social nature will be crushed if other children continue to reject her.
As a parent living with secondary infertility, I know how fortunate I am to have a smart, funny, all-around-awesome child. I also know the beauty of watching a young child learn and grow. I long to have that experience again with another child.
Divorce may be particularly difficult for only children. This is true for children without any siblings as well as virtual only children, those who are separated by seven or more years from their closest sibling. Children with special-needs siblings can also feel like only children, particularly if the sibling is unable to engage interpersonally.
My heart didn't close when my son was born. I fell in love, and every day I fall more deeply under his spell.
I'm reluctant to have another baby. I selfishly want to prolong a period of time when I don't have to speak to my son in half-sentences with a quarter of my attention all while trying to race across the living room to keep the baby from killing himself on the edge of the coffee table.
Out of the blue last weekend, apropos of basically nothing I could immediately ascertain, my 7-year-old announced that he wanted a brother.