open office

Giving employees control over their space helps them work better.
Not that long ago, work was a place. Now, it's a state of mind.
There have been quite a few articles written recently around open office spaces and why we need to get rid of them, why they're bad for engagement, why they're bad for productivity, and on and on why they are so bad for organizations.
The science of workplace is still in its infancy. Our culture has not caught up with technology and all that it has enabled us to accomplish. This causes stress and pain in the very place we spend the majority of our waking hours: work.
Although there is still some good evidence that knocking down physical barriers at work is a good thing -- putting workers
"I've formed interesting, unexpected bonds with my cohorts. But my personal performance at work has hit an all-time low," she
Bashing the open office is getting a little too easy. It's not destroying the workplace or trapping America's workers on the dark side, and it doesn't need to die.
While we may be past the worst of the Great Recession, many companies still feel the need to stretch the human resources they have as far as possible. It's no surprise, then, that we're still experimenting with ways to pump up productivity while deflating costs.
During the day, this Amsterdam design studio looks like a typical workspace. But at 6 p.m., someone turns a key, and all