opm

Cleanup from the weekend's snow storm could take several days.
It would have been so easy for the OPM to have made at least a simple reference to the generations of LGBT employees and others who were branded "immoral" and "unsuitable" for federal employment. There has never been an apology for them.
The OPM hack put them even further ahead by identifying 21 million American adults that have applied to work for the Federal government. No doubt espionage for China will remain the primary use for this data, but just as we update our view of identity in the 21st century so too might the PRC update its plans the use of such data.
Last weekend, TheUpshot published the most dangerous identity theft threat: the non-expert's tendency to underestimate the magnitude of problem.
Reputation. It is hard to get, hard to maintain, hard to control; especially in an era of hacking by governments and criminals alke.
Smokey the Bear says, "Only you can prevent wildfires." Now, that wildfire is the OPM breach. Yesterday it was the IRS. The day before that, it was Snowden. Tomorrow, it'll spark up somewhere else.
True or False? There was no way the Office of Personnel Management could have prevented hackers from stealing the sensitive personal information of 4.1 million federal employees, past and present. If you guessed "False," you'd be wrong. If you guessed, "True," you'd also be wrong.
"We are working collaboratively with OPM and DHS to resolve this matter quickly and look forward to resuming service on all
Federal prosecutors have documented at least 350 instances of faulty background investigations done by private contractors and special agents for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management in recent years.