organized religion

Even Americans who identify with a specific religion aren’t necessarily choosing to join a church, synagogue or mosque.
One of the most significant lessons I learned growing up in a Christian household was that no matter what I do, God is looking out for me.
Gohmert asked "if you could decide what 40 people you put on the spacecraft that would save humanity, how many of those would be same-sex couples?" Less than a year after he made those remarks, a plan was hatched to send exactly 40 gay people into space to put his hypothesis to the test.
A caller on the Diane Rehm radio show just now described himself as "a Christian man" and went on to criticize -- justly, in my view -- the effect of church attitudes towards towards girls' sexuality.
I would ask whether our organized religions have become so organized as to have ceased being the compassionate and nurturing places for those who need and seek them.
Since religious people are in the business of hope, some believers like myself think this decline might just be the best thing that ever happened to organized religion. Though painful and confusing, the time we are entering offers opportunities for renewal.
"It was absolutely devastating," former Hasidic Jew Shulem Deen said.
In an era of rapidly declining church membership and religious affiliation in America, Hayward has founded an online community to provide interaction and resources for people in search of 'spiritual independence.'
In an era of memetic culture, and the spread of instantaneous communication of ideas, symbols and other significant cultural information, can its structures, traditions and hierarchies follow suit?
While some say only one religion leads to God, and others might say all religions lead to God, I would say the opposite: That no religion leads to God.