orientalism

Brunner and Engleharts' Ancient One challenged a predominantly Christian culture and provided an alternative worldview, but
To be Asian-American today is to expect cultural appropriation -- and unabashed, openly celebrated Orientalism -- from a
If you are a teacher, school official, or perhaps even a student or parent in California, you have probably heard about the controversy that has raged for a decade about how India and Hinduism are depicted in California's History lessons.
While terrorism is a real problem in the world, it is also one that is socially constructed as perpetrated by Muslims and Muslims alone. This leads to dangerous and problematic stereotypes and tropes of Islam and Muslims.
The Islamophobic imaginary reduces everything related to Islam and Muslims into a singular frame that is negative. Trump's primary source of information is TV news and talk shows, which illustrate the total saturation of the public atmosphere with Islamophobia discourses.
What we have today is a West that is retreating militarily and shrinking economically, yet one that still speaks as the lord and master in command of the fates of nations and continents.
One can imagine how fascinating this must have been for a history buff. By that time I had dedicated a few years to tracing
If Coldplay's "Hymn for the Weekend" is the theme music for your upcoming weekend, let us stop you right there. The music video takes the complexity and vastness of Indian culture and squeezes it into the long-romanticized Western narrative of said culture.
Living in the Midwest, I realize that the humanity of Muslims is best displayed just by being there. Better than an image of a random person, you witness me.
To lose a dear friend leaves a hole in the life of each who loved him. Losing the well of wisdom that is a great mind leaves gaps in the fabric of civilization, one of the great tragedies of human mortality.
The harem is an institution that we need to know about and take seriously. Moreover, given that polygamy is today permitted and practiced in many Muslim nations, the harem is still a relevant subject.
Islam is not nearly as alien as some have made it out to be. It was born in the greater Hellenistic world of Late Antiquity, and has always been in conversation with the traditions it has encountered.
The uncomfortable truth is that essentialized conceptualizations that say "Islam = violence" or "Islam = peace" are insensitive to the alterations and negotiations that characterizes lived Islam in interaction with myriad Muslim constituencies and non-Muslim actors.
A funereal atmosphere descended over western capitals with the announcement of Turkey's parliamentary elections' results, widely described in European and American media as a "shock" and a "black day for Turkey." The picture painted appeared very bleak, as a stream of reports, editorials and op-eds by opposition figures warned of a "return to autocracy and despotism" and declared the outcome as a threat to the "survival of democracy" in the country.
In 2012, a militant group wielding crude shovels and pickaxes damaged the ancient Sufi shrines in Timbuktu, Mali. The militant group, known as Ansar Dine (Defenders of Faith), attacked the city's ancient mosques and mausoleums associated with local Sufis, arguing that shrine worshipping is offensive to Shariah.
Before Nepal and Baltimore seized headlines, news that a CIA drone strike mistakenly killed an innocent American hostage in January momentarily energized our meager debate on drones. It is time for us, as Americans, to exercise our responsibility as citizens and take control of the debate.
From Harem, by Lalla Essaydi. Stretches of the body not hidden under fabric are obscured by calligraphy drawn on by Essaydi