orion

The second shuttle disaster changed the landscape for America's space agency.
The booster generated 3.6 million pounds of thrust.
Let's get this over with once and for all: We are going to Mars. The only questions are: When? Who? How? Which way? And, of course, why?
Sometimes you have to change course to get on course. And the first small step in doing so may be to realize you didn't really know where you were going in the first place - and why.
In the midst of a series of technical glitches that delayed the planned launch of the Orion capsule by a Delta IV rocket on Thursday, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden is reported to have told NBC News, "We're now on the way to Mars, and that's what's most important." Uh, no.
Seven days; lots of science in the news. Here's our roundup of this week's most notable and quotable items.
(Story continues below image.) The Orion crew capsule will embark on its first voyage Thursday morning, and here is where
While the first launch of Orion (a program which has already been around for a decade) is an important step, NASA is nowhere close to having its own manned space system.
In early December, NASA will take an important step into the future with the first flight test of the Orion spacecraft -- the first vehicle in history capable of taking humans to multiple destinations in deep space.