Orson Scott Card

They shared their writing about domestic chores: hating when the task is unappreciated or taken for granted, but often enjoying
For week 47 of 52 books in 52 weeks I read Bill Bryson's One Summer: America, 1927. And for week 48 I read Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card.
I wonder if I'll have to turn in my "Friend of Dorothy" card now. Recently I dared to see Ender's Game, the target of an LGBT boycott campaign because the author of the book, Orson Scott Card, is an unrepentant homophobe. And so he is; that much is clear.
I was going into Ender's Game with very low expectations because the trailers made it look like a horrible money grab of a movie. But now, having seen the film, I must say... The trailers did this film NO justice.
Much has been made of Orson Scott Card's Mormon heritage and the influence it might have had on his beloved series, Ender's Game. But what about the new film? Does it have Mormon -- or even broadly Christian -- overtones?
How do I pass along one of my favorite childhood treasures, knowing that it was authored by someone whose beliefs are truly ugly to me?
As a newcomer to the series, I found myself much more interested in the film's take on leadership, the military, war, and empathy for one's enemy.
“I’ve had no criticism. I’ve had savage, lying, deceptive personal attacks, but no actual criticism because they’ve never
When I was 11 years old my father handed me a copy of Ender's Game. I'd been reading science fiction for a while and the escape it provided was a life-saver. I was a lonely kid, often unable to connect to other children. I was precocious. I was a nerd. And I was gay.
This isn't the first time the 71-year-old has defended "Ender's Game." In July, he reasoned the film's storyline doesn't