OSHA

$41,600 in fines, no criminal charges. A plumber’s death in a trench cave-in shows how the country values the lives of workers.
Labor advocates say highlighting abuses is a crucial tool to deter bad employers.
It's the largest individual whistleblower order ever issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
By Paul Feldman and Stuart Silverstein, FairWarning Soon after beginning their cleanup of a fume-filled tanker car at an
A government report says safety hazards are underreported in the meat and poultry industries.
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration plans to post the workplace injury data on its website, just like a public-health grade for a restaurant.
Thirty-one years ago, life was perfect. Alan and I watched the sunset as we finalized our wedding arrangements for April 28th. That night, I smiled as I thought about Alan lifting my wedding veil over my eyes, embracing me, and beginning our new life together. Our time together was cut grievously short.
Today is Workers' Memorial Day, a time to remember and honor our fallen brothers and sisters in the labor movement all across the globe. But while technological advancements should be making the workplace safer, deaths and injuries on the job are still a major concern.
If the argument is that workers' lives and lungs must be sacrificed to ensure that foundries and fracking operations and construction companies can make bigger profits, then the GOP will take the side of CEOs who value workers as trivial.
Federal agencies doling out billions in contracts for construction projects, nuclear facilities management, weapons disposal, and other high-risk tasks, need to be informed about the records of the corporations vying for those dollars. No lobbyist spin should get in the way of keeping American workers safe.
It's known as the silica rule, and it's a big frigging deal.
If you oversaw the Department of Defense, wouldn't you want to know that one of your biggest contractors had a history of serious safety violations?
Pervasive violations of worker safety and health standards at giant Fortune 500 firms like Honeywell underscore the need to hold federal contractors accountable for the hazards to which their workers are exposed.
President Obama's Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order aims to protect hard-working Americans by requiring companies with an ongoing history of violating safety and labor standards to clean up their acts and comply with federal health and safety laws before being rewarded with taxpayer dollars.
For too long, many corporations have taken a cavalier attitude to worker safety, but when these corporations are federal contractors paid by U.S. taxpayers, the public demands a special level of accountability.
According to their report, many of the reporting states could not answer the simplest question: that despite the old bans on asbestos, how many public schools continue to struggle with asbestos-containing materials?