oswaldo-paya

Raul Castro travels little and when he does he prefers politically like-minded countries. His absence in Cadiz was expected, as he has never gone to any Ibero-American summits. Perhaps he prefers to avoid possible critiques of the state of human rights on the island.
Angel Carromero has been sentenced to four years in prison for the traffic accident that killed two opponents of the regime, Oswaldo Paya and Harold Cepero.
By the time they told me I was "being transferred to Havana," I could barely raise my eyelids and my tongue was practically hanging out of my mouth from the effects of prolonged thirst. However, I felt that I had won.
The sweat of the three women who put me into a police car still sticks to my skin and in my nostrils. Huge, hulking, ruthless, they took me into a windowless room where the broken fan only blew air towards them.
Given the political background of the Carromero case, there is a visible anticipation in the international community and among island's dissident activists as to what may happen in this case.
A lengthy editorial in Granma on Tuesday marked the beginning of legal proceedings for murder against Angel Carromero.
In less than a year the Cuban opposition has lost two of its most important leaders.
This is not the first time the current Cuban president has spoken of a possible dialog with his neighbor to the north. In reality, however, the official discourse continues to feed off confrontation with the White House.
Today, in a humble family vault, lie the remains of a man who was the most promising leader of the Cuban dissidence. This is a hard blow to the country's democratic forces, and opens many questions about the future of the opposition movement.
Gone, physically, is a politician of great importance for the political transition in the island, a prominent layman in the Catholic Church, and a man who was a bridge between the Cuban diaspora and the nation.
Carter recently met with Fidel Castro casually and at length in his living room. As before, Carter found points on which to praise the government, but it sounded more like diplomatic formalities than real points of consensus.