Otto Perez Molina

The revered Latin American writer Eduardo Galeano wrote these words a few months after the events he alludes to: On May 10, 2013, 30 years after the crimes were committed, former dictator General Efraín Ríos Montt was convicted of genocide and crimes against humanity against the Maya Ixil population and sentenced to 80 years is prison.
The intertwining of past and present highlights the necessity of addressing impunity at its core in post-conflict societies, and the perils of not doing so in the immediate transition period.
On the eve of the upcoming elections in Guatemala, uncertainty is in the air. Ten days before the decisive round, it is still unclear if the people will choose the outsider Jimmy Morales, or the experienced former First Lady Sandra Torres to run the country.
He is being held in jail pending a hearing into accusations he made millions of dollars from a customs racket.
Congress is still debating Obama's proposed $1 billion aid package to Central America. In the past years, the majority of funding to Central America, allocated through the Central America Regional Security Initiative, has mainly focused on the drug war and fighting gangs.
The people of Guatemala are seeking justice. In the face of corruption, power, and violence they are demanding to be heard. We in the United States have a role in their struggle. We must say to our own government, "Not in my name."
The current meddling of the U.S. government in the political turmoil of Guatemala of the moment is not coincidental. It is the result of a dogged determination to control the geopolitical sphere of Central America, a determination that dates back hundreds of years.
Ending the failed war on drugs emerged as a major theme of the UN General Assembly meeting this week, after Guatemalan President Otto Pérez Molina took the floor to denounce drug prohibition and urge the world's leaders to experiment with "new models" for controlling drugs.
In 1982, investigative journalist Allan Nairn interviewed a Guatemalan general nicknamed "Tito" on camera during the height
Shortly after entering prison, he became Guatemala's most notorious inmate. After all, he wasn't a typical gang leader.