outing

Sexual orientation is about who you are, how you see the world and how you identify, not about your private sexual activity. And if you are public about it as a public person to a wide circle, it should be something reportable.
Everyone around you starts asking questions you weren't prepared to answer. Your reaction and feelings are valid. You have been wronged.  What I just described is exactly what you did to the LGBT athletes at the Olympics in Rio. 
After an avalanche of outrage, The Daily Beast last night removed a wretched article from its website which it had published on Wednesday and which had luridly exposed the sex lives of gay Olympians who were easily identifiable in the article and who were meeting on dating apps in Rio.
I don't think I've read another piece of "journalism" that caused me to feel as sick to my stomach as this one.
Reminder: anyone could be looking at you online.
There's little sympathy in the world right now for Gawker, which has engaged in questionable and egregious reporting, but Thiel has a lot confused here.
We claim we want to be treated equally as gay people, but then, in 2015, with much more acceptance in the culture, we still ask for special treatment of gay and bisexual public figures while every aspect of the sex lives of heterosexual public figures is dissected every day. We can't have it both ways any longer.
In an era where nearly every aspect of a pubic figure's life is considered fair game by the media, what are the rules around discussing their sexuality.
Gawker is still reeling from the controversy surrounding a post, which has since been removed from the site, that revealed