over50

We may look much younger than we really are. We may be in good health and show it. We may move briskly and upright ... but we forget that when we speak, our vocabulary, our phraseology, give away our age.
I'm Skyping with my friend Marie the other day, and as we're solving the world's problems, the subject turns to the upcoming May 8 holiday celebrating moms. We're both moms of now-adult children, so it makes us a bit reflective on the subject.
Men, please, before you demand that a woman be grateful for your unprovoked commentary on her presence or validate you by responding, consider that this is about your needs, your wishes, your demands. It's your problem, not hers.
Grandma and Grandpa have some stern advice for the younger generation: learn from their mistakes. Now that they've reached retirement, they're finding that a lack of funds is their biggest dissatisfaction, and they strongly urge younger Americans to open a 401(k) or IRA as soon as possible and fund it as much as possible.
How you look and feel in your fifties is usually the result of how you've been treating yourself since you were a young girl. I've committed my fair share of sins such as sunbathing without sunscreen (blisters on my shoulders and a peeled nose were to be expected every single summer as a kid), indulging in too much "Happy Hour" and extreme dieting.
So much for the conventional wisdom of downsizing your home when you retire. A huge percentage of families are moving into bigger homes -- many to make room for adult children who didn't fare so well during the recent recession.
Sneaking out to get a tattoo is something you might expect from a teenager -- not a 79-year-old grandma. So you can imagine