overdiagnosis

Aaron: There are two reasons for this. Firstly, some patients were misdiagnosed in the community - meaning they never had
”Everyone should understand that there are tradeoffs in screening. It’s not a simple it-can-only-help-you kind of story."
Here are three things to watch for as you discuss your brain health with your doctor: 1. Doctor rushes to diagnosis without
A predictable irony of the never-ending Affordable Care Act (ACA) debate is that the one provision that the Republicans should be attacking -- free "checkups" for everyone -- is one of the few provisions they aren't attacking.
1. Chronic kidney disease Before 2002, about 1 in 58 adults had chronic kidney disease, putting them at risk of eventual
Better screening tools are detecting more cancers. Women's lives have been saved. These same tools are identifying more cancers that won't result in any harm.
The signers of a new open letter are concerned about excessive psychiatric treatment, excessive dosing, careless polypharmacy, and unnecessary hospitalizations. And so am I. But I am equally concerned about inadequate funding of mental health care and lack of access to treatment for people who need it.
The evidence is compelling that we in the developed countries (especially the US) are overtesting for disease, overdiagnosing it, and overtreating.
It took me a decade -- first as a caregiver to my mother, and then as a practicing physician and patient advocate -- to figure out that the story is absolutely fundamental to medical practice. Indeed, it can save your life.
We already had a crisis in psychiatric diagnosis before DSM-5. It is a sure sign of excess that 25 percent of us qualify for a mental disorder and that 20 percent are on psychiatric medication.
The latest in APA's fluffy public relations has come from the president of the American Psychiatric Association. He has made two astounding claims -- that criticism of DSM-5 is somehow equivalent to criticism of psychiatry and that it signifies stigma against mental illness.
The American Psychiatric Association has proven itself incompetent to produce a safe and scientifically sound diagnostic system. Psychiatric diagnosis has become too important in people's lives to be left in the hands of one small and insulated professional organization.
Next year will bring the fifth revision in the manual’s history -- to be called DSM-V -- and one possible addition has caught
The DSM 5 assertion of rate neutrality is, just on the face of it, completely impossible. A simple comparison of how DSM IV and DSM 5 criteria are written makes apparent that DSM 5 has to be much more restrictive.
Grief is the normal and absolutely unavoidable price we must pay for having the capacity to love -- it is most certainly not a disease.
Preventive psychiatry may someday be of significant service in reducing the burden of human suffering -- but only if it can be done really well. And the sad truth is that we don't yet have the necessary tools.