overdose deaths

The death of 19-year-old Eric Chase Bolling has been linked to opioids.
In the case of opioid pain medication, not only is it often not medically indicated to use these medications, but we also take a significant risk each time we prescribe them. We risk our patient developing a dependence or addiction, we risk the medications being diverted or abused, we risk saddling patients with side effects that can be worse than their primary complaint.
Over 40 Americans die every day from overdoses of prescribed opiates.
Advocates say this is another important step toward preventing fatal opioid overdoses.
My daily routine now became searching the internet. I was at the mercy of which ever rehab popped up. Which ever place had
It's a hard road, the one that we walk after our children die from a drug overdose. It's a walk that numbs your feet from the miles of isolation and grief. I'm only one of thousands.
The arc of our family's story has been profoundly shaped by our decision to channel our energy in a positive way in order to help with our own healing, and to ensure that Jeff's death was not in vain and to help other families.
Overdose prevention advocates and drug policy reformers are feeling some wind beneath their wings as a result of a statement by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder encouraging expanded access to the overdose reversal medicine naloxone.
1. West Virginia (28.9) 2. New Mexico (23.8) 3. Kentucky (23.6) 4. Nevada (20.7) 5. Oklahoma (19.4) 6. Arizona (17.5) 7. Missouri
Drug policies that unilaterally curb access to prescription opioids can have unintended consequences, exacerbating the very problems, such as overdose, that they purport to solve.
Many people hate drugs. It is easy to see why. Most families have had a loved one with a problematic relationship to alcohol or other drugs. While it might be counterintuitive, people who hate drugs should be at the forefront of ending our nation's failed drug war.
The president, in refusing to bow to the intimidation tactics of the drug enforcement industry, has paved the way for my state, and possibly others, to show the federal government a new way forward on marijuana policy.
Just like ending alcohol prohibition, making the current crop of drugs legal simply means changing the laws. But changing the laws has been turned into a bloody legal and political battle that is about everything except drugs.
A number of doctors like myself in the past year or so have seen a sharp uptick in patients searching for a new doctor because the old doctor no longer wants to treat them. I have come to recognize the telephone call.
New York lawmakers are now considering two very different approaches to address accidental overdose fatalities: One bill will most certainly make the problem worse, while the other will likely save lives.