overparenting

In light of our personal experience and the data provided, I ask that you move toward getting rid of homework entirely, raising the issue with your teaching team and school administration. At the very least, please consider limiting it to flexible assignments like your current reading requirement.
If we continue to walk on eggshells to avoid offending these hypersensitive young adults, we are empowering their victimhood status. If we continue to indulge their irrational demands, we are robbing them of the opportunity to learn how to function independently in the real world.
Very few of us are likely to be the "most" or the "best" anything. But success, happiness and a good life aren't really about this. They're about learning to accept ourselves and pursue what has meaning to us. That is the best standard we can hold for ourselves and the most valuable lesson we can pass on to our children.
A recent study has been released that says helicopter parenting, especially in schoolwork, might backfire when it comes to promoting student success.
“You can never be too available to your kids, but you can be too interfering."
Why did parenting change from preparing our kids for life to protecting them from life, which means they're not prepared to live life on their own? And why do these problems I'm writing about seem rooted in the middle and upper middle classes?
Modern motherhood takes a toll on women's well-being, strains parents' relationships, weakens families, and certainly doesn't do children any good. My heart goes out to mothers, but I don't "revere" motherhood.
I've written these steps to provide encouragement to well-intentioned, devoted, loving, intelligent parents who feel powerless to stop themselves from overindulging, overprotecting and over-scheduling their children.
The problem with many parents hoping to boost their child's self-esteem isn't that they're praising; it's that they're overpraising.
As a parent, how do you stand idly by as your child falters, when all you want to do is set them up for success? How (when, where?) do you draw the line?
I've come to believe that parenting our kids is a lot like teaching them to ride a bike. It's a process. We begin by strapping them to us as infants and we do all the peddling. Eventually, we remove the training wheels -- and now our help is a tender balance of support and letting go.
I have a confession to make. I have gone to one of my sons' dorms and done his laundry. Just when I thought I had taken my overparenting to a new level, his roommate's mother took out a lint roller and began to roll their entire carpet on her hands and knees. Was I out-parented?
Relax, slow down, cancel the Mandarin lessons and put the parenting books back on the shelf. Use them as needed, not as gospel.
How much positivity is too much? Where does healthy stop and delusional begin? And, maybe more to the point: Why does this kind of stuff feel like a relief?
As parents, we all have that innate desire to protect and provide for our kids. Yet, at some point we must ask ourselves: Are we doing too much for them?
When Boston was hit by last winter's barrage of blizzards, my two oldest kids, then ages eight and five, spent their snow
If your kids are in high school, here is what you can practice: Tell them how much you believe in them, and prove it by practicing the art of letting go.