Oversight

HuffPost senior reporter Kevin Robillard speaks to Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA)
It's a preview of how Democrats can provide oversight without Republican support.
We know that nonprofits make enormous contributions to society. To protect the integrity of the sector, a revision to this law is needed. In the meantime, nonetheless, I hope you will step forward if you find yourself in a situation in which unethical practices are taking place.
On Constitution Day, let us remember that our American government was designed to put checks on the power of individuals in government who might slip out of control and begin making their own rules. The use of torture and cruelty was authorized by a handful of officials who believed they were exempt from oversight or review.
Can you imagine saying, "I don't have time to manage my staff" or "We don't have the resources to fundraise"? No, it wouldn't happen, because it's understood we have to invest in these things for our organizations to flourish.
But as dedicated and conscientious as some of the intelligence committees' members and staff are, there is a pattern of institutional failure. For much too long, the intelligence committees have been trying to do oversight in almost complete secrecy.
Even in this day of fragmented audiences and decimated newsrooms, major news organizations still have the ability to spark a national conversation around a given issue, by putting experienced, tenacious beat reporters on the story. So what's needed is a new beat, to cover secrecy itself.
Secretary of State John Kerry says if it were up to him, the State Department would already have a permanent inspector general, a critical position that has been vacant for more than five years.