oxford english dictionary

Although "fake news" was popularized by Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential election campaign, the term actually dates back to 1890.
“Contrary to popular belief, it doesn’t make me better at Scrabble, but it does make me proud.”
"Squee" and other fandom-isms were added to the dictionary this year. Here’s where they come from, and why they matter.
A few Roald Dahl-related terms were also added in honor of the author’s 100th birthday.
Why does the Oxford English Dictionary portray feminists as rabid?  
@HaggardHawks' second birthday has already been celebrated online with a fiendishly difficult quiz, but to mark the occasion all the more, here are 50 of its finest language facts and words worth remembering.
If we didn't allow English to evolve, we would hardly have words enough to express ourselves in our modern society, and we'd still be greeting each other by saying "Ēadig, þec tō mētenne."
By now you may have recovered from your initial outrage over the new words the Oxford English Dictionary authorized in its latest edition. If you missed the stories about it, read on.
While products like e-cigarettes may offer current adult smokers a path to quit, nicotine consumption has no place in the lives of young people.
Every three months the Oxford English Dictionary announces words that will be added into its reference collection. Here are some of the 900 newly added words.
I am joining in the fun, naming the 10 most overrated things of 2013. Not necessarily bad (though some of them can be awful) not stupid -- just overrated.
Our question is, in this year -- and the upcoming ones of this decade -- do we need to be more selfie or more selfless? Given the current trends and problems domestically and internationally, it seems to us that "selfless" should be the clear winner.
Type 6: The Colosselfie Type 2: The Piselfie Type 1: The Eiffel Towfie Type 3: The Versaillfie Type 4: The Stonehengfie Well