p5+1

Russia and Israel have a long history of diplomatic and military collaboration in the Middle East, dating back to the Arab-Israeli war of 1948, when Israel's triumph over its neighbors was largely attributable to Moscow's military support.
The American public has had enough of wars, doesn't know what to believe when politicians speak, and is more interested in taking care of things at home. This is not likely to change when the next president takes office, and Clinton and Trump know it.
I've had the opportunity to conduct public opinion polls across the Middle East in order to provide content for policy discussions at the UAE's annual Sir Bani Yas Forum. We surveyed over 7,400 adults in six Arab countries (Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE), Turkey, and Iran.
The Persian Gulf - a semi closed body of water - is at a serious crossroad and facing an uncertain future. Its population
The conflicts in Syria, Iraq and Yemen cannot be resolved unless Iran is at the negotiating table.
Amidst the background of a violent conflict that is destroying Yemen, the UAE seeks to prove to the world that the wealthy emirates are capable of more than just spending billions of dollars to create a first-rate military with advanced weaponry.
Now that a Senate minority has blocked the bipartisan majority from an up-or-down vote on arguably the most significant foreign policy measure in a generation, some in the media are rushing to judgment about winners and losers.
If GCC officials slowly pivot toward the perception that their long-term interests reside in an improved relationship toward Iran, such a strategic shift would be seen in Riyadh as an erosion of GCC unity against an emboldened Iran.
You can't always get what you want. (That's why it's called "negotiation"...)
The most tragic consequence of Congress killing the deal would be that it would eliminate the prospect for greater U.S.-Iran cooperation in the region on areas of mutual concern. It would lock in continued enmity between the United States and Iran, serving only to exacerbate tension and conflict across the Middle East. To go down this path when such a mutually advantageous alternative exists would truly be a blunder of historic proportions.
As a potential catalyst for further diplomatic means of conflict resolution, the comprehensive agreement provides a unique opportunity to seriously engage Iran and possibly alleviate these tensions. Given the significant ramifications that these openings may herald for the future of Iran-Arab world ties, it is more important than ever to engage and analyze viewpoints from scholars and analysts based in the region on the future of Iran's role in the Middle East and Arab security.
Since the P5+1 deal with Iran -- the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) -- was announced on July 14, there has been much discussion and debate about it, with lots more undoubtedly to come.
After six years of waiting, the United States and Egypt have rekindled formal strategic dialogue. Secretary of State John Kerry's visit to Cairo symbolizes a rapprochement between the U.S. and one of the key players in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region.
We are told by the deal's supporters that the only alternative to this deal is war. We respectfully disagree. We do not support war against Iran, nor have we ever advocated for the use of force, though we have always believed in a credible military option as a way of convincing Iran of our seriousness of purpose.
It is also important to be clear about what the agreement does not do and was not intended to achieve to judge the diplomatic accomplishment squarely on its own merits. No arrangement, save for one imposed by one party upon another, is going to be viewed as perfect,
And it will cost over $100 billion just to restore the country's oil and gas sector.
In the ongoing 4-year-long civil war, the Islamic Republic- one of the major bank-rollers for the Syrian government- has approximately spent between $6 and $35 billion a year in order to keep its staunchest regional ally, Bashar Al Assad in power.
Earlier in the month, President Obama announced that we had a deal. The P5+1 world powers had come to an agreement with Iran. With no loss of life, our diplomats were able to prevent Iran from building a bomb. The gravity of this win should make all sides rejoice. Unfortunately, that wouldn't be politically expedient.
The following is the English translation of statements made by the Iranian Foreign Minister Muhammad Jawad Zarif at the Iraqi