palestine un recognition

Denis McDonough brought a strong message to an American pro-Israel conference on Monday, telling a crowd of 3,000 attendees that “an occupation that has lasted for almost 50 years must end, and the Palestinian people must have the right to live in and govern themselves in their own sovereign state.”
During his remarks at J Street, McDonough pushed back against the notion that the U.S. was promoting a solution that would
“I was talking about what was achievable and what was not achievable,” Netanyahu continued, referring to his pre-election
This week, President Obama's initial proposal in the fiscal cliff showdown sparked merriment and outrage from Republican leaders, who pretended they hadn't heard the same details six weeks ago. Susan Rice continued to have nomination meetings even without a nomination, but failed to win over GOP senators who are still "troubled" by Benghazi but not by their own failure of judgment on Iraq. Palestine scored a victory at the U.N., where it was given non-participating observer status -- the same status Mitt Romney has in U.S. politics. Romney was invited to the White House for lunch, where he and the president dined on white turkey chili [insert your own "white turkey" punchline here]. Meanwhile, revised figures show the U.S. economy had its best third-quarter performance in five years. How this fits into Jack Welch's conspiracy theories about "imagination defying" government stats, we'll just have to wait and see.
Palestine had no problem getting an upgraded status at the United Nations, isolating Israel and the United States and giving Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas the boost in stature he so badly needed. OK, so what happened?
Mr. Abbas: I know that this proposal is very difficult for you to accept. I write to you on the eve of Yom Kippur, because my heart is weary and full of sorrow; because I see the two-state solution slipping away.
Whatever the exact result of the Palestinians' UN bid will be, we must not let Netanyahu spin that Israel scores a moral victory if some major European countries will vote against it or abstain confuse us.
Israeli Prime Ministers have reiterated their acceptance of an independent Palestinian state alongside Israel, but their efforts to achieve a lasting peace with the Palestinians have largely been discounted.
Palestine has taken the right decision. A diplomatic showdown is bad behavior in colonial eyes, but a public show of hands in the U.N. is the right thing to do at this point.
Like Friedman, I feel terrible about all this. And I'm not alone. Most people who care about Israel understand that it can only survive if it ends the occupation and supports establishment of a Palestinian state.