pandemic

The world is under threat from the growing risks of potentially pandemic diseases.
Rees explores the opportunities and risks that cutting-edge science presents.
The Zika virus was first identified in Uganda in 1947 and later in East Asia. Because it seemed to be confined to those regions
The Rio Olympics has been hit by allegations of a conflict of interest over the dangers of the Zika virus to tens of thousands
“Our results show that targeted school closures can reduce the overall number of cases in the population."
According to the World Health Organization, road traffic accidents are now the eighth leading cause of death globally, and the leading cause of death among young people aged 15-29. Yet, in the vast majority of cases, these tragedies we somehow translate into "acceptable losses."
The public is right: The world is not prepared for the next epidemic. We're no better equipped to respond quickly to an outbreak than we were a year ago. But we can be - and at a fraction of what it would cost if we don't act urgently.
Microsoft co-founder and richest man in the world Bill Gates says his biggest fear is keeping him up at night, and if the nightmare becomes true, 33 million people will die.
The complexity of our problems should not mask the simplicity of the solution. We are a people who are desperately afraid of everything. The root cause of police brutality rests solely in our own fear.
Let us not lose this opportunity to save lives right now and countless lives in the future, while also reducing the tremendous economic and security risk that "failed health states," and the threat of pandemic, pose to the world.
SCIENTIFIC PLANNING DAVOS, Switzerland, Jan 23 (Reuters) - The worst-ever Ebola epidemic is waning, but after ravaging three
Here are my thoughts on what the world needs right now and how you can step up to make things better in 2015...
Did the Democrats lose the Senate over Ebola? Pundits are parsing the exit polls, and they'll no doubt come to contradictory conclusions. But the surreal notion that President Obama's incompetence put America at risk for dread disease fed Republican efforts to cast Democrats as a danger to the nation.
If Ebola continued as confined outbreaks for a limited time, a patent for a drug to treat it, or a vaccine to prevent it, might not feed the corporate bottom line. So we have waited for a desperate crisis when a cure might bring enough profit to light up the bottom line.
The Internet and social media now puts all of us, the intrepid and the faint-hearted, at the same table together and aggregates our fears. Our collective challenge is to reverse the equation, roll up our sleeves, and use the sum of our talents to address the real threats to society.
Let's clear up one huge misconception right here: Ebola cannot be spread by casual contact, shaking someone's hand or after inhaling airborne germs. Transmission requires coming into direct contact with bodily fluids, which include feces, saliva, sweat, urine and vomit.
Emergency funds are supposed to avoid earmarks and compartmentalization, and to provide a ready pool of money for pandemics
With ugly politics and intense greed blocking the way, it's up to us to turn things around and vote with our forks to better protect our own health, each other, and the planet we (as well as countless species) call home.