paramedics

Paramedics, firefighters and EMTs, who often experience work-related PTSD and depression, have significantly higher rates of suicide than the general population. And in many jurisdictions across the country, they aren’t receiving the mental health services they need.
If you only knew how proud I am to be a Paramedic, to be a life changer, a life saver, an all too often forgotten hero. Happy EMS Week to some of the most incredible people I have the honor of knowing and working alongside. You are heroes.
Paramedics with the most experience with cardiac arrest achieve the highest survival rates in patients.
It scares the hell out of me that we will not have another generation of good cops coming onto police departments because of the hatred and political environment. I don't want any of our family members or friends to join the police department, but I also don't want to live in a country where the people who should have been the cops don't want to be anymore.
California's Alameda County takes a more holistic approach to health care.
Mike DeWindt and Steve Lucero explain what their jobs entail.
I am by no means an expert in health IT, but I do know that we need to demand more from these systems. And that includes more interoperability, easier access, and up-to-date information.
One of the sharpest criticisms against making naloxone widely available to people at risk for drug overdose is this: If people have a medicine on hand that allows them to reverse a drug overdose themselves, won't they stop calling 911?
I decided to sit up, run some fingers through my matted hair, and, at the very least, cross my legs delicately at the ankle -- even if it felt like I was giving birth to Balrog triplets. And that's when it happened. A fart with the supernova velocity and resonance of the Hella Supertone Air Horn unexpectedly erupted from me.
Five months ago, Nufar Gross was on the battlefield treating wounded soldiers. The 33-year-old IDF paramedic spent her summer providing medical treatment to both wounded soldiers and civilians during the Operation Protective Edge, which lasted 50 days.
And especially for all those who risk their lives at night to keep us safe, warm and comfortable, we should all say a special thanks and prayer for safety. Because being up all night is interesting, and sometimes profitable. But it's almost never preferable. And I speak from experience.
As I glanced up the stairs, the crowd of tweens suddenly parted and down rolled this jacket-clad snowball of a boy right at me. Luckily, I was standing in the middle of the stairs. By reflex, my body traveled back to high school and struck the pose of a third-baseman fielding a ground ball.
I was talking by the time they arrived, but because of my speech which has been directly affected by ALS, they thought I may have had a stroke because I was slurring my words. Nope, no stroke, just ALS.
I'd never felt like this before. After a few steps out of my bed, I found myself lying on the ground holding my chest trying to remedy the excruciating sharp pains. I couldn't move, breathe, talk. It hurt too much. Everything hurt.
"Medicine is the bridge to working together. We're all people and there's absolutely no difference between us," added Bruria Adini, the director of the BGU program. "We need a joint and collaborative response that can save lives."
The reason? She had pledged not to speak until the end of Shabbat on Saturday night, reports Haaretz. According to Haaretz
You have your credit card to make purchases, your drivers license for identification, but what about a card that could save
UPDATE: We have received concerns that the man in the video below is mentally disabled, but according to a scoop by Urlesque