parenting books

As parents -- as people! -- we all (I'm pretty sure all of us, yes?) wish there were a simple way, a method that is tried and true and guaranteed to get us the results we hope for... be this a fitness program, a healthy diet, a supplement protocol, a parenting handbook, a financial plan, a spiritual practice, a qualified approach to ANYTHING.
A key element in my journey to understand my daughter's sudden angst has come from a book entitled, The Conscious Parent, Transforming ourselves, empowering our children, by Dr. Shefali Tsabary.
I'm blessed to be able to work from home with my son, but there are still times when I wonder if I could be doing more as a parent.
The other day, my daughter asked why people read parenting books. I told her that sometimes I read them to understand her better. She responded, "That book isn't about me, it's about somebody else. If you don't understand me, ask me."
I am often stressed out. And as much as I hate to admit it, I can't always hide this side of myself from my kids.
In the spirit of Father's Day, I thought it might only be fitting to highlight a few of the dads that I've met along the way that have written books. Not just 'books', but brutally honest works of non-fiction and comedic memoirs about fatherhood, written by actual fathers. Dudes that have ALL been in the trenches of parenting combat.
We make parenting harder for ourselves because we think it should come naturally. We make parenting harder on ourselves because we think the kids are making it hard on us without realizing we are missing some skills that could make it easier.
Her words are about navigating the whole of parenting, and about the friends who rally round and hold you up while you do
“I spanked her. I’m so f*cking sorry.” I’m not sure any group of parents has ever been subjected to as much widespread derision
They say that those who fight the hardest are those who are the most alike, so perhaps it shouldn't have surprised me that when it comes to parenting, the English and the French have quite a bit in common.
I am a person who craves direction. I love to follow recipes and check-lists. And I thought that the approach that had brought me success as a student and a professional would naturally work for parenting too.
You can chart your own path because, and this is important, no one else has ever raised your kids before.
My son, Mattias, is a charmer. As introverted and crowd-averse as I am, he feeds off the energy of a group. His uncle Matt calls him "Slumdog Millionaire" because he's convinced that, if you dropped him in the middle of Calcutta, he'd be running the joint inside of six months.
A Spoiled Baby Is a Socialist Baby Before Spock’s 1946 book, a strict approach dominated baby advice books. Experts advised
Relax, slow down, cancel the Mandarin lessons and put the parenting books back on the shelf. Use them as needed, not as gospel.
I wonder if our adult kids' pervasive fear of failure hasn't returned them to their childhood bedrooms, dissatisfied and unemployed. Yes, it's a tough economy out there, but have we made them afraid to take chances, to bypass meaningful engagement and social justice opportunities?
Neuroscience and cognitive psychology are two of several exciting new fields about the brain and behavior. This book does sound justice to these subjects and to the evolving way that science can (and must) inform and assist everyday human endeavors, including parenting.