parents of college students

How to step back but stay connected to your emerging adult.
While college expenses can be overwhelming, knowing these potential tax benefits may help you make the financial burden of higher education less taxing.
While you will be happy to have your college student home for the holiday break, remember that this can be a stressful time for them, especially if they are a first-year student still adjusting to a new, more independent lifestyle. And even though no one, especially students, likes feeling financial pressure at the holidays, it's important to have a discussion about your child's finances during your short time together.
The cost of college is not declining. And with the constant reminder that student loan debt is getting out of hand, parents and students are trying to find ways to make higher education more affordable. Even so, some families may not even realize that they are voluntarily increasing their expenses.
It's about that time again. Sleepy college towns will begin to awaken, abuzz with an excitement that only college students can inspire. Young scholars will soon arrive on college and university campuses, ready, or not so ready, to take on the world of higher education.
For the past 20 years, I've been directing orientation programs for incoming college freshmen. All of a sudden, I am the on the other side of the equation -- I am the new face -- a little nervous, but eager to get started.
The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines senioritis as "an ebbing of motivation and effort by school seniors as evidenced by tardiness, absences, and lower grades." Sound familiar? Here are a few ideas for staying on track and completing high school in good standing.
Write a thank you note -- not a text or email message. Even if you're lounging poolside in Cancun, buy a postcard and show your gratitude to at least one person.
Over the winter break, your student may accidentally refer to their college or university as "home." If this causes dizziness and a pit in your stomach, you're not alone.
For a first-year student adjusting to life away from home, the smallest inconvenience can feel like a dramatic, earth-shattering event. First-years live in a world of extremes. Many arrive on campus expecting the college experience to be perfect immediately.
First-year students want a friend group. And they want it immediately. If a student doesn't have one, was ditched by one, or is in the process of seeking a new one, college can be a very lonely place.
Young men don't want to be pushed at 17 or 18 to make these kinds of choices with all the weight they carry. They are still finding out what they like, what they can do, what is important to them.
A lot of students will choose to drink alcohol at some point during their time in college. That's the reality. It's how they drink and how they value drinking that always gets my attention.
For most college students, there will never be another time in your life when so many understanding, well-trained people are genuinely interested in helping you succeed.
The plan was to drop my son off at college this weekend and come home to write about my newly emptied nest. But then Isaac turned toward New Orleans, and my goal of being a laid back, non-helicoptering mother turned into something else, too.