Parents Of Gay kids

A "boys will be boys" attitude offers little comfort to a kid suffering through school. My kid deserves better. All kids do.
After all, being a supportive mom isn't so B-A-N-A-N-A-S.
April 17 marks the 19th year of the annual Day of Silence, which brings attention to anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender
I wore baby blue, and Jimmy was forced to wear my pink pajamas when we were about 2 and 3 growing up in upstate, New York.
You might be thinking, "Amelia, this isn't going to go anywhere. It's California! It's not like it's going to become law." And you are right. But it doesn't take away from the fact that there are thousands of people in this country just like Mr. McLaughlin, who think a bullet in his head is exactly what my son deserves.
Now, he's at it again, telling a "700 Club" viewer that she should treat her gay son, who just came out of the closet, like
Alexander's court date was reportedly set for Feb. 19. While details in the case are currently scarce, Jacqueline Alexander
Sure, by the numbers, assuming people are straight is a safe bet. Most people are. But assumptions are dangerous. This particular assumption implies to my son that there is something wrong him for being other than straight. And there's not. He should be exactly who he is.
Here was the ultimate mom test. Was I the real deal? At this crucial moment, probably the most important one of my life, my mind had shut down, and I'd lost my voice. I'd expected to perform much better. This had been a D-minus at best.
You'd think that by the time my son Harry turned 4 years old in 1994, I would have learned how to handle Halloween. A guilt ghoul swallowed me whole the first time my boy wanted to go trick-or-treating dressed as a girl. But, no, some lessons don't come easy.