Parents of transgender kids

I have long since learned that fitting in for a kid (or adult) doesn't mean being the same as everyone else. It means being accepted for who you are.
For transgender people, claiming our authentic gender identity is very challenging. For children, that's especially true. Our voices are silenced very early.
Ultimately the age of dinosaurs will pass; their fossils will be discovered by future anthropologist-archeologists to be scrutinized, dissected, and viewed as oddities whose ideas will seem curious for their naiveté.
In a blog post on The Sean Hannity Show's website, one mother of a Mitchell student was critical of the use of the book in
She listened politely as I shared Sam's latest trials and tribulations. When I paused to catch my breath, she pointed out my neglect in a way only a dear friend could, "It's good to hear about Sam, but you have another child, too... how is Josie?"
I've been asked many times before if I fear that my son will "change his mind." What if he "decides he wants to be a girl again"? What if I made a mistake by allowing him to transition at such a young age? I know that without walking a mile in my shoes, it's hard to understand. So let's pretend my child wasn't born to be transgender.
After writing a blog debunking myths and misperceptions about transgender children, I was inundated with messages from parents of transgender children thanking me for it. I spoke with eight parents in detail, looking for what patterns emerged from their narratives. What I found was both amazing and heartbreaking, all at the same time.
The Haywards were conservative Mormons who were not sure how to respond to their child when she came to them, confused that she felt like two people -- the boy she saw in the mirror and the girl she knew herself to be.
This week I talked with filmmaker Alexia Kosmider about her new documentary, TransJourney, which follows Sandra on her cross-country journey to share in the life of her child, formerly her son, now her "new" daughter Annabelle.
How do we change society? We start by listening to the truths of these children and believing, rather than dismissing, them. If we can start by believing the child's clearly stated truth, we are well on our way.
As a society, we have just begun to talk about what it means to be transgender, and I, like most men of my generation, knew almost nothing. If there is anything that I've learned, it's that the subject is deeply complex. I think I understand something fundamental, but I really don't.
Recently, a video about a transgender child in California went viral. Sadly, like every other conversation about transgender children, the comments section was often unkind. Scanning the comments, I saw the same poorly thought-out ideas keep popping up. I think it's time to put these misconceptions to bed.
My daughter Grace passed away in September 2010. There wasn't an obituary. There wasn't a funeral. There wasn't a casket or even a body to put in it. No one sent me sympathy cards. No one brought me casseroles. This wasn't because no one cared yet. It was because my child was still alive.
In their book Allies and Angels: A Memoir of Our Family's Transition, Terri and Vince Cook lay bare their experience and journey of parenting a transgender child. They show us that resolve and steadfast love are what truly define the parental instinct.
Quickly my mind raced through the catalog of her interests, behaviors and clothing choices, and I saw how many clues I had missed. I saw my new daughter for the first time, through the actions of my nephew.
A member of the Gender & Family Project's Parent Group joined HuffPost Live this week to discuss the challenges of raising
I dream about the day when families with transgender children will be able to have classic Thanksgiving celebrations. Unfortunately, many families like ours celebrate alone or with a few close friends because they are not considered part of the extended family anymore.
Severe pain in my 17-year-old son's abdomen took us to the ER last week. It's one of those situations that everyone dreads, but if you're transgender, there can be an added level of anxiety when the medical professionals aren't current on trans health care. Such was the case for us.
I look back on how I used to define love. I realize that without this amazing experience with my transgender son, I would not have recognized the different ways that love could be expressed. Risking the unknown, our family has been able to create a richer life.