paris terrorist attack

At least 84 people are dead after a man in a truck plowed through a crowd celebrating Bastille Day in Nice, France, on Thursday. The past few weeks have been so inundated with news like this that it's easy to ask yourself "how should I react?"
It seems that for the bars and restaurants of Paris, life is back to normal: young Parisians congregate at the terraces, smoking, drinking and laughing. Even near Le Carillon and the Bataclan. But the French government, it seems, has given in to the fear.
I have faith in the future generation that my students belongs to. They've proved to me that they could learn: they are the future French citizens.
One can't dispute Republicans' concerns about terrorism's threat to national security, concerns which Democrats fully share, but one can argue how best to proceed -- and impugning Muslim refugees, again, plays into Islamic terrorism's hand.
As the terrorist attack in Paris sparks worldwide fear of similar reprisals and a bloody shootout and hostage situation in a five-star Mali hotel exacerbates those concerns, global energy security reels under the pressure of unfathomable geopolitics.
Part of our trip to Paris will be somber, but I hope it will expand my knowledge and experience, the main reason I travel in the first place.