participatory budgeting

Participatory budgeting is democracy in action. But is it inclusive?
Although Portugal has allocated only €3million for this first year, the fact that it is operating nationwide has given rise
In particular, the book examines the rise in the United States of participatory budgeting (PB), a process that empowers community
In our private lives, we have quite a bit of say over how we spend our money. Granted, an employer or client ultimately decides whether and what amount to pay us, but if we want to spend more on a house than on vacations, or more on our children's education than on dining out, that's our decision.
Within portfolios, philanthropy can reward more entrepreneurial approaches to public-private partnerships, cutting-edge technology, cross-sector data and civic engagement. And it can leverage a modern toolkit, including social impact bonds and other innovative financing mechanisms, impact investing and outcome-focused partnerships with civil society, government and industry.
Technology is creating new expectations for how citizens engage with their world. Governments must adapt to keep pace or risk the dissatisfaction of those they represent. The problems are large and complex. But civic innovation can serve as an important part of the solution.
Thankfully, Mayor de Blasio trashed Bloomberg's ill-conceived plan. The logical question is: "What now?"
Citizens, for their part, grow cynical and angry and learn nothing from poorly designed, empty-gesture or cynically rigged public participation exercises. As a consequence, the spiral of mistrust, gridlock and political dysfunction deepens.
Who knows what your neighborhood needs better -- you or City Hall? Participatory Budgeting, a powerful new tool employed by innovative cities around the world is answering that question for millions of urban residents.
After we just completed an election season where democracy was under attack across the country, a movement has sprung up in New York City that seeks to strengthen rather than subvert involvement in the democratic process. It's called participatory budgeting.