patient advocacy

And those organizations don't always disclose their industry ties.
Until the breast screening community embraces tailored screening for women with dense breast tissue to reduce risk of advanced disease, preventable fatalities will continue.
While my heart and soul grieve from the death of friends from breast cancer, it also motivates me to continue to advocate for density reporting and education and access to multi-modal screening to reduce advanced disease and premature death from breast cancer.
As a physician, I take very seriously my oath first to do no harm. This is true of most doctors. However, as the disconnect and gap between policy and practice widens, caregivers are increasingly embattled.
We are the men and women committed to ethical and equitable health care delivery in the face of rapidly changing and uncertain times. We are your advocates, health care leaders, coaches, and care coordinators. We are your nurses.
We should and must continue to invest sufficiently in research to keep pace with scientific opportunity. Congress must increase funding for the NIH by at least 10 percent ($3.2 billion) in FY17 to help patients like Lorri who are determined to find solutions to what ails us.
There is so much to say about this profession that goes unexplored and unpublicized, and yet, nurses continue to be at the forefront of patient care delivery every step of the way.
Connecticut radiologists, once in opposition to density reporting laws, have demonstrated through its data in clinical settings what has been in the literature for more than two decades.
So if I walk 12,000 steps today, for example, and if I did that for the next six months, based on who I am rather than who
Women have a right to access health information that affects them. Appropriate screening, discussed between physician and