patient advocacy

Until the breast screening community embraces tailored screening for women with dense breast tissue to reduce risk of advanced disease, preventable fatalities will continue.
While my heart and soul grieve from the death of friends from breast cancer, it also motivates me to continue to advocate for density reporting and education and access to multi-modal screening to reduce advanced disease and premature death from breast cancer.
As a physician, I take very seriously my oath first to do no harm. This is true of most doctors. However, as the disconnect and gap between policy and practice widens, caregivers are increasingly embattled.
We are the men and women committed to ethical and equitable health care delivery in the face of rapidly changing and uncertain times. We are your advocates, health care leaders, coaches, and care coordinators. We are your nurses.
We should and must continue to invest sufficiently in research to keep pace with scientific opportunity. Congress must increase funding for the NIH by at least 10 percent ($3.2 billion) in FY17 to help patients like Lorri who are determined to find solutions to what ails us.
There is so much to say about this profession that goes unexplored and unpublicized, and yet, nurses continue to be at the forefront of patient care delivery every step of the way.
Connecticut radiologists, once in opposition to density reporting laws, have demonstrated through its data in clinical settings what has been in the literature for more than two decades.
So if I walk 12,000 steps today, for example, and if I did that for the next six months, based on who I am rather than who
The lack of acknowledgement by health care providers of the impact of dense breast tissue on missed, delayed and advanced
Doctors used very different body language when interacting with black and white actors who portrayed dying patients.
Filming a short segment with FujiFilm at RSNA 2015 In the 10th floor hotel suite in Chicago, I relived my patient story of
The horrific shooting at Planned Parenthood in Colorado Springs that left three dead serves as a stark reminder of the grave consequences of inflammatory politic rhetoric and poor legislation.
I have a lot to be thankful for this November, and celebrating this day with people who reached out to me and my family during our time of crisis is where I want to be today. I lift a glass and say thanks to friends, family and medical professionals whose actions and words helped make today's birthday happen.
After decades of educating the public about the importance of early detection, the new guidelines are indeed confusing and controversial. In the new guidelines, the recommended age for annual screening mammography was increased from age 40 to age 45 for women "of average risk for breast cancer."
In recognition of my 11 years engulfed in patient breast health advocacy, I present 11 Awareness Facts that, at the time of my diagnosis, were unaware to me.
Doctors also experience their own problems with definitions. Their associations, administrators (and the insurance companies
Our only "demands" are that we and our physicians have the time to properly address our health questions and that we both have access to and choice in treatments without "unnecessary" obstacles being placed in our path.