paul anderson

“Every day, I go to work still enjoying the challenge of creating expression and body language. It’s never a burden, never a job. It’s just fun.”
Alan Ayckbourn is the chronicler of the middle class. Up in Scarborough, England, where he turns his plays out and puts them on -- or has done for many years -- he looks at people from every angle. He effortlessly gets their foibles and peccadilloes down with accuracy. Depending on his mood, he can shift from melancholy to hilarity and often back again.
The filmmakers did their best to accurately portray what producer and director Paul W. S. Anderson calls "probably the most spectacular disaster of the ancient world." I talked with Anderson about the ways he incorporated history and science in order to make the movie as accurate as possible.
Watching Shun-kin in the Rose Theater, you think more often than not that it's hard to know what you are looking at. Leaving the Rose Theater, you find yourself uncertain about what you've just looked at. One thing you do know for sure is that it was enthrallingly theatrical.