Paul Robeson

"I'm an American who is infinitely prouder to be of African descent."
The wedding and the churchyard The laughter and the tears The dream that's been growing For a hundred and fifty years The
July 4 is an occasion for Americans to express their patriotism. But the ways we do so are as diverse as our nation.
Let's look at how Hollywood and capitalism use a film about communism to foster anti-communism at a time when people are once again seeing through and challenging the system itself.
The foundation of leadership is courage. Civil rights pioneer, Mr. Paul Robeson, exercised courage by leveraging his moral strength to challenge racism and promote racial equity.
Today most people of African descent would agree that slavery was no blessing to their ancestors, yet many of them still perpetrate one of the cornerstones of slavery; that is the stripping of our cultural identity as African people.
There's a very visual and historical table book out that showcases posters the depicts beautiful and haunting images of black thespians in cinema over a course of 100 years.
McQueen revealed his plans last week at the Hidden Heroes event in New York, held by the Andrew Goodman Foundation, named after one of the civil rights workers killed in Mississippi in 1964. Harry Belafonte, who was Robeson's protégé and friend, is working with McQueen on the project.
Despite the conventional wisdom that patriotism means "my country -- right or wrong" and is best displayed by blind flag-waving, to many Americans patriotism means loyalty to a set of principles, and thus requires dissent and criticism when those in power violate those standards.