Paul Robeson

"I'm an American who is infinitely prouder to be of African descent."
The town I live in The street, the house, the room The pavement of the city Or the garden all in bloom The wedding and the
July 4 is an occasion for Americans to express their patriotism. But the ways we do so are as diverse as our nation.
Let's look at how Hollywood and capitalism use a film about communism to foster anti-communism at a time when people are once again seeing through and challenging the system itself.
The foundation of leadership is courage. Civil rights pioneer, Mr. Paul Robeson, exercised courage by leveraging his moral strength to challenge racism and promote racial equity.
Today most people of African descent would agree that slavery was no blessing to their ancestors, yet many of them still perpetrate one of the cornerstones of slavery; that is the stripping of our cultural identity as African people.
There's a very visual and historical table book out that showcases posters the depicts beautiful and haunting images of black thespians in cinema over a course of 100 years.
McQueen revealed his plans last week at the Hidden Heroes event in New York, held by the Andrew Goodman Foundation, named after one of the civil rights workers killed in Mississippi in 1964. Harry Belafonte, who was Robeson's protégé and friend, is working with McQueen on the project.
Despite the conventional wisdom that patriotism means "my country -- right or wrong" and is best displayed by blind flag-waving, to many Americans patriotism means loyalty to a set of principles, and thus requires dissent and criticism when those in power violate those standards.
There are two Presbyterian churches in my town, a stone's throw from each other. In a neoclassical temple on Nassau Street, Princeton's prosperous, mostly white middle-class parishioners gather to worship every Sunday.
The moment we heard that Riley B. King -- known universally both as "BB" and as the King of the Blues -- had breathed his last, we invited ourselves to a very private memorial service. Our own.
When he found the story of a little-known but highly successful black filmmaker from the 1920s, music producer Bayer Mack knew he had to correct history. Oscar Micheaux: The Czar of Black Hollywood is the result of Mack's work. The film tells an important story and places race relations and black history.
Just five days after many Americans observed the 46th anniversary of the death of one civil rights icon, the 116th birth anniversary of another icon went largely unnoticed.
Chuck D! Public Enemy!! Possibly, no -- definitely the most culturally influential Hip-Hop group of all time! For his role as lead MC in Public Enemy, Chuck D is the pure definition of an artist activist.
The flag, as a symbol of the nation, is not owned by the administration in power, but by the people. We battle over what it means, but all Americans have an equal right to claim the flag as their own. Progressives understand that people can disagree with their government and still love their country and its ideals.
Beyond his legendary athletic abilities and his brilliant scholarship, Robeson is best known as an Artist and as an Activist. His deep baritone emerges from a deep resolve to fight against oppression everywhere.
A society that really wants to celebrate the life of an important figure -- to keep his or her memory alive in our collective psyche -- must do so publicly and permanently.
The flag, as a symbol of the nation, is not owned by the administration in power, but by the people. We battle over what it means, but all Americans -- across the political spectrum -- have an equal right to claim the flag as their own.
So I come to you not simply as a fan, but also as someone who knows well the inner workings of sports and entertainment and as someone who wants to see you live up to your full potential, not just as elite athletes, but as men.