Paul Tillich

You may not agree with the method of protest, but can you be silent against what is being protested against, the ongoing
Spoiler: I won't. Today, in a secularized government and society, we think of religion and politics as separate spheres. This
Each president's perspective couldn't be further removed from one another, when considering that they are offering different appraisals of "who" is afforded protection and "what" is identified as a threat. But perhaps they also illuminate two sides to the same American culture of violence.
The road to character, David Brooks is telling us, is away from self to other, then back to self --a new self, whole, reformed, dedicated. "No person," he writes in his concluding chapter, "can achieve self-mastery on his or her own. . . . Everybody needs redemptive assistance from outside."
Maybe we are simply too arrogant and self-centered to believe that the questions we pose have lots of right answers instead of the ones we have come up with, that problems have lots of good solutions even if they cause us some other problems.
We have come to look for policies, programs, and politicians to fix what ails our society. We have come to think that the right job, the right salary, or the right medications will fix our personal struggles.
I've tried meditating a few times - a very few times. I'm well read on the subject, however. Indeed, I've spent way more time reading about meditation than I've spent doing it.
Choosing to become part of Christ's story involves helping the world to overcome loneliness, suffering and hatred. Christians can easily seem hypocritical because this is such a lofty aim.
"So the odds of recovery are 94-99%. Pretty good, huh?" We were two middle-aged guys whose morning routine included a walk to the corner to buy a newspaper from a blue, metal stand.
The twentieth century is now over. The giants are dead. Long live the giants! I'm talking theologically here. In intense