Paul Tillich

So I see the knees being taken, the fists being raised, and the embraces being offered as the continuation of Heschel's praying
Today, in a secularized government and society, we think of religion and politics as separate spheres. This is not a theocracy
Each president's perspective couldn't be further removed from one another, when considering that they are offering different appraisals of "who" is afforded protection and "what" is identified as a threat. But perhaps they also illuminate two sides to the same American culture of violence.
The road to character, David Brooks is telling us, is away from self to other, then back to self --a new self, whole, reformed, dedicated. "No person," he writes in his concluding chapter, "can achieve self-mastery on his or her own. . . . Everybody needs redemptive assistance from outside."
Maybe we are simply too arrogant and self-centered to believe that the questions we pose have lots of right answers instead of the ones we have come up with, that problems have lots of good solutions even if they cause us some other problems.
We have come to look for policies, programs, and politicians to fix what ails our society. We have come to think that the right job, the right salary, or the right medications will fix our personal struggles.
I've tried meditating a few times - a very few times. I'm well read on the subject, however. Indeed, I've spent way more time reading about meditation than I've spent doing it.
Choosing to become part of Christ's story involves helping the world to overcome loneliness, suffering and hatred. Christians can easily seem hypocritical because this is such a lofty aim.
"So the odds of recovery are 94-99%. Pretty good, huh?" We were two middle-aged guys whose morning routine included a walk to the corner to buy a newspaper from a blue, metal stand.
The twentieth century is now over. The giants are dead. Long live the giants! I'm talking theologically here. In intense
There is a form of atheism that is closer to the divine than the standard theism witnessed in the church. For wherever a concern of beauty, an embrace of life and a love of liberation are exhibited the sacred is proclaimed.
If Jonathan Fitzgerald is right that the New Sincerity is making a new, earnest morality possible, it's also the case a that a New and Faithful Pluralism is helping more and more Christians explore themes like these.
Theologians through the ages remind us that doubt is integral to belief and even to prayer. Paul Tillich argued that "doubt is not the opposite of faith; it is an element of faith." God is present in our doubt as much as our certainty.
It was the Seven Deadly Sins that made the budding theologian in me question my first gay pride parade at age 18. I wasn't questioning the morality of LGBTQ people and their relationships. I was questioning the "pride," a sin that is the root of all destruction.
Courage was lacking among key figures in positions of power and authority at Penn State and its football program. The 20th-century theologian Paul Tillich comes to mind when I reflect upon this.
Critics of religion enjoy pointing out how many wars and how much suffering has been caused in the name of religion. But only science has given us the tools to kill each other in ways never before imagined.
When I use the word God, I have absolutely no idea what I'm talking about. And yet, paradoxically, I've staked everything there -- with this Mystery that I cannot comprehend with my finite mind.
Osama bin Laden's death and the southeastern tornadoes have brought to light one of the fundamental questions of humanity: Why do we have evil, suffering, pain and death in the world?
What symbols or metaphors might we use to open our minds to a new way of thinking about God that works in the 21st century?
Chic and I share many of the same heroes: Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Paul Tillich, Martin Buber, and Albert Camus. Chic also knows