paul tough

But a new book highlights the programs that are making an impact.
This is a conversation with Paul Tough about his new book "Helping Children Succeed" -- which you should really read, even if the whole "grit" thing drives you bonkers.
I first read about Angela Duckworth's research on "grit" in Paul Tough's How Children Succeed. Most compelling was Tough's
Teens face a variety of complex issues with the transition from childhood to adulthood. When these issues are compounded by perceived scarcity, whether in the form of poverty, abuse or lack of a nurturing support system, it can be even more challenging for teens to generate or maintain their self-esteem and find their way forward.
Everyone who has an interest in America's future should read How Chidren Succeed by Paul Tough, who quit his job at the New York Times to research and produce this unflinching, fascinating yet ultimately hopeful look at educational attainment.
In an information age where some predictions say that knowledge will double every 12 months and soon every 12 hours, the skills that we need to develop in our children don't look like the skills we developed in school.
KIPP Schools, Success Academies, Democracy Prep and any number of other "no excuses" schools are not developing true grit and resilience other than the numb grit required to endure humiliation and the resilience necessary to get up and go to school every day.
There are some techniques parents can use that encourage learning. Parents can give children "the right" kind of help by systematically reinforcing habits that help rather than hinder the learning process.
The shift toward restorative justice and similarly supports-based disciplinary policies is encouraging. We must build on that momentum to make nurturing non-cognitive skills a core component of policy, rather than the afterthought it currently is.
Adolescence begins with puberty and ends, ambiguously, with the makings of adult independence: marriage, financial self-sufficiency, employment.
The national focus on elite and other selective post-secondary institutions obscures the enormity of the positive work other institutions provide and undermines the valuable information they can share about successful strategies for first-generation college students.
Recommendations from the Best K-12 Teachers in the Country Their original list contained over 55 books. Last week, I sent
Building a relationship with a caring adult is the foundation for many great things. Kids who are at risk desperately need the sense of security that high-quality mentoring can offer. It's about fostering trust and opening up a young person's mind to possibility.
I spent my week with How Children Succeed, by Paul Tough. I do think every parent should read this book. It was recommended to me by the principal of my daughter's school. I am definitely glad HE read it.
This is not the first time the Times has uncritically conflated something as comprehensive as "a better education" with something as singular as student reading and math scores. I imagine it won't be the last.
The effects of poverty shape long-term health and development in profound ways. When children are exposed to adverse experiences -- physical, emotional, or substance abuse, mental illness, violence-- their systems are stressed to the max.
For the last 20 years, however, non-educators have rolled the dice in the quest for "transformative change." They have tried to blow up "the status quo" in the faith that something better would naturally emerge.
There's an important new consensus developing around how people learn -- and a missed opportunity about how to start applying that knowledge in schools. We'd be wise to pay closer attention to both trends.
Mansfield Park begins with a question that is still depressingly familiar. What can be done to help a disadvantaged child?