paul tough

But a new book highlights the programs that are making an impact.
This is a conversation with Paul Tough about his new book "Helping Children Succeed" -- which you should really read, even if the whole "grit" thing drives you bonkers.
It's good that this research leads us consider on how schools can foster the habits of mind, heart and work that are important
Teens face a variety of complex issues with the transition from childhood to adulthood. When these issues are compounded by perceived scarcity, whether in the form of poverty, abuse or lack of a nurturing support system, it can be even more challenging for teens to generate or maintain their self-esteem and find their way forward.
Everyone who has an interest in America's future should read How Chidren Succeed by Paul Tough, who quit his job at the New York Times to research and produce this unflinching, fascinating yet ultimately hopeful look at educational attainment.
In an information age where some predictions say that knowledge will double every 12 months and soon every 12 hours, the skills that we need to develop in our children don't look like the skills we developed in school.
KIPP Schools, Success Academies, Democracy Prep and any number of other "no excuses" schools are not developing true grit and resilience other than the numb grit required to endure humiliation and the resilience necessary to get up and go to school every day.
There are some techniques parents can use that encourage learning. Parents can give children "the right" kind of help by systematically reinforcing habits that help rather than hinder the learning process.
Adolescence begins with puberty and ends, ambiguously, with the makings of adult independence: marriage, financial self-sufficiency, employment.
The national focus on elite and other selective post-secondary institutions obscures the enormity of the positive work other institutions provide and undermines the valuable information they can share about successful strategies for first-generation college students.