paying off debt

Blogger Melanie Lockert discusses the key strategies that helped her pay off a total of $81,000 in student-loan debt. Here are the key takeaways from her journey to zero debt.
Sometimes you need to simultaneously look backward and forward. That's the case when you not only need to pay off high-interest credit card debt but also know that you have a big purchase looming, such as gifts for the upcoming holidays.
How does a public school teacher living in the country’s priciest city pay off the loans he borrowed while attending a top
We are encouraged to work extra shifts, pick up side jobs, and work as much as we can now despite so many regretting working
There are a lot of words you can use to describe San Francisco -- scenic, eclectic, hipster-friendly, but unfortunately, cheap isn't one of them.
Personal finance experts love to argue about the best approach to shrinking your debt: paying off loans with the biggest balance first vs. tackling your highest-interest debt. Now comes new research that proves what the smart financial advisers have said all along: the best method is one you can stick with until you're debt-free.
I cut our grocery bill in half. The grocery total would vary every month. But in January 2014, I only spent $170 on groceries -- my lowest total ever. I like to feed my family organic produce, but I had to let that go for the sake of a bigger goal.
Paying off credit card debt might be one of the best moves for your personal finances. This can improve your cash flow, giving you an opportunity to build an emergency fund or save for retirement. Plus paying off credit cards helps increase your credit score.
Before tying the knot in 2008, my wife, Kim, and I never discussed money. But I had financial skeletons in my closet. With $18,000 in student loans and another $18,000 from an auto loan, I brought a significant amount of debt into our marriage.
When Julie Berry's personal and professional lives were falling apart, if someone had told her that everything would be OK -- better than before, even -- she probably wouldn't have believed it.
I've heard of some families overcoming step two of Dave's debt program in just one year, while other have taken seven years. But it's the small victories you accomplish with smaller debts that can keep you steady on your goal.
Even a slacker can be debt-free. Here's how.
Luckily, someone special woke me up to the reality of my financial situation. It took a lot of hard work -- and some serious creativity -- but three years later, I'm almost debt-free. Here's my story.
Being student-loan-free means I'm old. As in, I should have my life figured out by now. I should be married (which I'm not), have kids (which I don't) and know what I want to do career-wise (again, I don't). I'm almost 29 and don't know what the rest of my life will look like.
I took my debt by the horns and rode it right out of my life.
Don't be scared -- it's totally fine if you failed econ in college and even better if you're completely Excel illiterate. These five tips will get you started.
I want you to make smart choices and just not leap at the first option that comes along. When it comes to getting out of debt, the best advice you can hear is "do not assume." Only you can have your best interests in mind.
After the graduation parties, job hunting, and teary goodbyes are over, it's time to figure out the heavy stuff: finances. How much debt are you going to be in? Do you need a cosigner on your loan? Is there an app for this!?!?
Come visit me on FirstClassWoman.com to share how you're improving your financial picture. Here are 6 tips to get you out