Pebble Mine

“The record is clear: The Pebble Mine is fundamentally flawed ― it’s the wrong mine in the wrong place.”
Opponents are concerned a mine would harm the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world.
Whatever uncertainty there is about Donald Trump's actual agenda as president -- or more fundamentally about the legitimacy of his presidency -- there can be no doubt about his hostility to environmental protection and progress.
For Northern Dynasty -- and for any potential partner - the hard truth is that the Pebble Mine is going nowhere.
The Pebble Mine should be terminated - once and for all. And when that day comes, when the only thing left of The Pebble Partnership is a mountain of legal bills, don't be surprised if the company's last gasp is an attempt to pass them on to U.S. taxpayers.
Deterioration continues in the financial condition of Northern Dynasty Minerals ("Northern Dynasty" or "NDM") -- a small Canadian exploration company, and the only remaining investor in the once formidable Pebble Limited Partnership ("Pebble").
Why? Why is a House Science Committee without a single member from Alaska so fixated on something we live and breathe every day, and so oblivious to how strongly we feel as Alaskans?
While the Pebble Mine scheme may appear all but dead, Northern Dynasty's outside lawyers are alive, kicking, and doing very well indeed. As long as there is money to fund their pursuit of frivolous claims, look for this to continue.
Disappointed by the unambiguous rejection of his company's charges of EPA misconduct, Pebble's CEO Tom Collier immediately condemned the investigation he'd requested as "an embarrassing failure" and a "whitewash".
Canadian exploration company Northern Dynasty Minerals is the only partner remaining in the once formidable Pebble Partnership - the poorly-funded proponent of the reckless scheme to build a massive mine in the headwaters of the world's greatest wild salmon fishery.
The battle to stop the infamous Pebble Mine isn't over, but if you're a shareholder in the embattled project, 2015 was another disappointing year.
In its latest attempt to derail EPA's review of this potentially "catastrophic" project, Pebble paid former Defense Secretary William Cohen, The Cohen Group, and DLA Piper LLP to prepare an "independent" report that, unsurprisingly, confirms that EPA's review should be derailed. Follow the money.
Based on a brief, undefined investigation, Secretary Cohen concluded to no one's surprise that his client has been unfairly treated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in its federal Clean Water Act review of the mining project -- just as his client has argued for years.
This month the industry's biggest lie -- that it can be trusted with our water -- is once again on display as another mining disaster has spilled millions of gallons of toxic mining waste and chemicals into our streams, rivers and lakes.
Just how many reasons does the Pebble Partnership need to stop its disastrous plans to build the Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska? NRDC explored that question in a series of ads in Politico. The ads give the Pebble Partnership several compelling reasons to quit the Pebble Mine, culminating today with a simple request: walk away from Bristol Bay.
Over 70 years old, and he was always willing to make the trip -- whatever the trip, wherever it took him -- to talk, to testify, to tell the terrible story of the uniquely reckless scheme by international mining giants to poison the communities and wild salmon fisheries of Alaska's Bristol Bay with a gigantic copper and gold mine.
The company hasn't given up on its dreams to build a colossal mine at the headwaters of the world's greatest wild salmon fishery. Last January, with the sale of special warrants to existing investors, it raised about $15 million -- almost half of which came from a hedge fund in the Cayman Islands. Where is the money going? Not to mining but to lawyers and lobbyists.