pedestrians

The driver was taken into custody shortly after the incident.
She jumped in front of the boy just before the speeding car rammed both into a wall.
In collaboration with the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Work for Better Bangladesh Trust (WBB) initiated thorough research
This article was originally published on 24/7 Wall St. Once introduced, cars quickly became part of America’s culture — but
Last month as the National Capital Region was digging out from our latest Snowmageddon, I had an "aha" moment cycling to work on Northern Virginia's ice-crusted, snowy Mount Vernon Trail.
If you don't have the money to make it aesthetic, at least you can make it functional. This seems to be mentality that Hoboken, New Jersey, America's most walkable city, endorses in some of its streetscape improvements.
If you want to know New York, get to know its street cuisine. I learned it early. Growing up in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood, I would get a lunch of two hot dogs in steam-soft rolls from the guy who set up his stainless-steel pushcart on the corner of 17th Street every morning, rain or shine, Saturdays and holidays, summer-fall-winter-spring.
I've been trying to find something to compare the horror that I feel; some other life experiences people go through that tear their souls out, that rip their heart literally out of their chest so they simply don't want to live.
Finding environmentally friendly modes of urban transportation is a key issue for cities working to ensure sustainable development. In Nairobi, a number of studies have identified the significant risk to pedestrians and bicyclists operating in and around the city.
Many cities have transformed their roads to increase pedestrian and cyclist safety. What started as an experiment in Times Square in 2009 has become permanent.
Detroit is admittedly a tough place. Those who choose to be here grasp life at its deepest level. And the energy Detroit has isn't something you can pinpoint. If you go around looking for it, you won't find it because you can't really see it.
Teens who have been hit or almost hit also think its normal to cross the street while texting or talking on the phone.
At long last, a significant number of older urban centers in the country seem to be recognizing that it's a good idea to build infrastructure that accommodates pedestrians. The trajectory clearly manifests improvement with each passing year.
For most Americans in most places, walking -- that most basic and human method of movement, and the one most important to our health -- is all but impossible. Maybe not literally impossible, but inconvenient at best, and tragically dangerous way too often.
Biking in Manhattan is a contact sport. It includes confronting cabbies and dodging pedestrians (who in welcome ways have a supremacy of the street). It demands nano-second reflexes, a sense of daring and nerves stronger than your bike frame.
Like elsewhere in Chinese life, pedestrians have accepted their place on Beijing's streets. They've embraced patience. I, on the other hand, find myself regularly glaring at unsuspecting drivers, unaffected, as they wiz past me, tires barely missing my toes.
Sidewalks, bike lanes, pedestrian crossings, parks, and green areas are all pieces of a complex puzzle to help citizens navigate their city safely and sustainably.
We all know that walking is the best form of transport in big cities: it's cost-effective and environmentally friendly, and