peggy olson

As the President of an agency, it's my responsibility with the support of my management team to ensure that all voices and
my debut novel Copygirl chronicles the (ahem) fictional exploits of a female copywriter trying to beat the boys' club at their own inane game of keep-away. Not unlike Mad Men's Peggy Olson.
The actress tells HuffPost Live that playing Peggy helped her understand feminism.
The last shot we see of Betty, shows her sitting alone at the kitchen table, chain-smoking. Perhaps, what's meant by the
Mary Wells Lawrence, advertising visionary, trailblazer and legend, shares the simple advice that has led her to get everything she has ever wanted: Double Yourself.
Certainly, on a superficial level, we can say that all of the major Mad Men characters journeyed forth through significant life changes. But as much as these characters gained scars and wisdom through their journeys, none of them actually changed over the course of a decade.
Now that Betty's story is literally ending, we see her going back to school -- but it is no coincidence that her efforts for self-fulfillment are going to be cut short.
If you're working your pioneer tush off to survive, then that's what's on your mind, survival. Not, "Hmm, did I remember
Roger Sterling will definitely be one of the favorites of the Mad Men characters missed when the show concludes next year. But also I believe one of the other secondary characters will also be missed, and that is Harry Crane, acted by Rick Sommer.
Why is an episode about victory named after one of the most famous defeats in world history? Is it because the crushing blow to Napoleon proved to be a smashing victory for the British Empire and its allies?
Women rarely admit our ambitions out loud not only because we fear failure -- a fear we share with our male counterparts -- but because wanting to succeed might make us seem less feminine. That's the tricky part.
"The Strategy," Mad Men's penultimate episode of 2014, was a very important episode about work and relationships. And in the best tradition of Mad Men, it showed that, for these folks, the most important relationships revolve around work while the best work is about relationships.
Don Draper continued his move toward redemption and re-emergence as a career success in the latest episode of Mad Men, the more than a little bizarre "The Runaways." But as one brilliant talent continued in a positive direction, another careened precipitously into emotional collapse.
As Mad Men nears the close of its final season's first half, much of the discussion surrounding it has morphed into a rhetorical echo chamber: Does it deserve the hype?
It's not exactly a stretch to say that the episode is structured in three parts to show Don's past with his first wife demonstrating why she remains stuck in an untenable child-like mode, his present with his second wife and why her unstable situation is untenable for him, and his hoped-for future at his past employer Sterling Coo.
But that big wheel in the sky keeps on turning, and the calendar keeps on flipping back around, and the whole great circle