PEPFAR

Today, people all over the world come together to commemorate World AIDS Day. This morning, through the U.S. President’s
Now on our fifth anniversary, we recognize and are grateful for the ongoing support of PEPFAR, PRRR's partners, and the global
Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Abraham Lincoln, men whose heritage had no connection to Africa, did more for the continent.
It's important that when we look back at the 35 years of fighting HIV/AIDS that we consider our successes -- that's how we can summon up the motivation to carry on the struggle.
A data revolution is underway at the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). We're using data in transformational ways to prevent more HIV infections and save more lives, ensuring our investments have the greatest impact by targeting lifesaving interventions to the populations and places with the highest HIV/AIDS burden.
Alarmingly, adolescent girls in sub-Saharan Africa are more than twice as likely as their male counterparts to be newly infected with HIV. Today, on International Women's Day -- and every day -- we must recommit to changing this troubling trend.
Globally, 2015 will be viewed as a turning point for international development. In September, world leaders gathered at the United Nations General Assembly to adopt a set of updated targets -- the Sustainable Development Goals -- to guide development efforts over the next 15 years.
On Human Rights Day, we join the global community in recommitting to protecting the human rights of all people. The protection of human rights provides the foundation for ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030, a global goal the world set this past September.
In one unique area of foreign policy -- the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief -- the United States has shown that Democrats and Republicans, liberals and conservatives can work together, save lives and enhance our security -- all by doing good.
Sex workers are recognized by the World Health Organization, along with other major health and human rights organizations, as one of four key populations in the global fight against HIV/AIDS.
The world has gotten this far because of massive investments in the HIV response. To actually end the epidemic, though, it is imperative that we resist complacency, cutbacks in funding and a sense that, on any level, our work is done.
Today, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) released its 2015 World AIDS Day report, in advance of December 1. The report finds that 15.8 million people were accessing antiretroviral treatment (ART) as of June 2015.
Since its inception, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has been a beacon of bipartisanship. Launched by President Bush in 2003 and expanded by President Obama, PEPFAR has saved millions of lives -- and helped to change the trajectory of the global HIV response.
Now is the time to move forward with greater commitment than ever to ensuring that women and girls - and their sexual and reproductive health and rights - are at the center of U.S. policies at home and abroad.
As the international community comes together at the U.N. General Assembly to set the new global sustainable development agenda, today progress was made toward fulfilling the goal of promoting health and well-being for people in the most challenging environments around the world.
Criminalization creates an environment of stigma, discrimination and systematic exclusion that prevents sex workers from accessing health and support services and increases their risk of violence and abuse.
Globally, fewer children are being newly infected with HIV than ever before. This is according to data released earlier this week by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. Yet, we are not on track to reach the Global Plan's goal of a 90 percent reduction by the end of 2015.
This week's Financing for Development (FfD) Conference - a major gathering to advance the post-2015 development agenda - will be critical in deciding how the world's governments and private sector and civil society partners will contribute to international development in the future.
PEPFAR continues to be crucial in the fight against HIV/AIDS because it addresses the global need for access to life-saving HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention medications. It's my hope that Congress holds steady in its commitment to PEPFAR, and ending this disease once and for all. Our work is not done.