performance reviews

If you work in HR or if you are a manager with direct reports, you have probably pondered these questions more than once
The answer to effective performance management in my view is not doing away with reviews altogether. It's institutionalizing effective, actionable feedback - something managers and colleagues should contribute to throughout the entire year.
Ratings are a necessary evil and companies may go back to using them.
Once upon a time when I was a summer associate at a major investment bank, a Managing Director convened all the women in
For years, employers and HR pros have been searching for the elusive perfect employee engagement strategy. Organizations tried new benefit packages, overhauling company culture, and supporting career development.
While it must be recognized that there are systematic barriers and HR policies that formally contribute (or don't contribute) to gender equality, here are three practical tips that managers can employ if they want to start removing gender bias from their organizations
And my stand is... still apathy. But it's active apathy. That's right: It's not just that I don't care if you decide to have
The world of work is changing fast with unemployment on the decline and the Talent Wars in full swing. The major skills gap is still a reality and the buyer's market is highly competitive for qualified candidates.
I dread getting my annual judgement handed down to me. I am instantly transported back to the age where naps were part of school and when my favorite activity was building walls and knocking them down with my boyfriend, Clarence.
Saying that few people like performance reviews is a massive understatement. Employees find them painful, at best, and often describe them with words such as demeaning, irrelevant, and disrespectful.
Jeffery Tobias Halter is the country's leading male expert on advancing women and engaging men. He is the President of YWomen
I am not talking about abolishing policies to avoid litigation or processes for implementing benefits, pay, and employee downtime. I am calling for the end of HR in the sense that we can no longer view people as company "resources" to be catalogued, attributed a value, and leveraged as replaceable cogs in the company machine.
As an employer, you prefer to have honest employees. It's through honesty that your business is able to thrive because it helps develop a positive company culture. Just as your business needs honest employees, your employees need you to be honest with them.
The performance review--it's a good way to help people understand where they're at, but at the same time, many employers do them so badly that everyone ends up hating them. Here are seven common blunders that we all hate.
Jim had been with the company for many years and was undoubtedly the best in product knowledge and financial delivery. He'd
Absolutely no one looks forward to performance reviews, which typically occur right before the new year. It's even more frightening to hear your boss mid-year say, "We need you to improve your performance," regardless of the industry. So why is this a good thing?
When I talk to business leaders, employee performance and engagement are top priorities. And, it's not surprising that most employees at any company in the world want to perform well and be highly engaged. Since we have the same goals, why is it so hard to reach the outcome we all desire?