Permian Basin

Living through the booms and busts in a West Texas oil town.
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This New Year, an old trend may become a new trend as conventional drilling in North America is once again in the spotlight at a time when oil prices continue their slump and the unconventional becomes increasingly uneconomical.
When it takes up to four million pounds of sand to frack a single well, it's no wonder that demand is outpacing supply and frack sand producers are becoming the biggest behind-the-scenes beneficiaries of the American oil and gas boom.
By calculating the production numbers on a well-by-well basis for shale gas and tight oil fields throughout the U.S., Post Carbon concludes that the future of fracking is not nearly as bright as industry cheerleaders suggest.
Regardless of pipeline capacity, Permian Basin crude is shaping up to be the next big oil boom thanks to new technology.
While it's understandable to focus on a single problem, what succeeds in providing domestic energy may, for example, worsen global warming, as if extracting more domestic fossil fuel were an overall solution rather than a continuation of a problem.