perpetual war

America's one-party system on foreign policy and war comes with consequences. Don't discount the reality of a military draft with either Trump or Clinton, especially with low Army recruiting numbers. Only Bernie Sanders opposes perpetual quagmires in the name of defeating terror.
It's nearly Veterans Day, that time of year when we remember we have veterans. As a reminder that we also have war, the headline in my local paper recently read, "US pledges to send 50 special-ops troops to Syria."
The Intercept has obtained a cache of secret documents detailing the inner workings of the U.S. military’s assassination
We need to stop using military force as a solution to everything -- indeed, it is a solution to nothing. We must push for the repeal of the 2001 AUMF and prevent the passage of a new AUMF. We cannot rely on Congress or the president to reverse the course of rampant U.S. militarism. It is up to us to make our voices heard.
No single review or interview can do justice to Pay Any Price -- the new book by James Risen that is the antithesis of what routinely passes for journalism about the "war on terror." Instead of evasive tunnel vision, the book offers big-picture acuity: focusing on realities that are pervasive and vastly destructive.
That whole litany of killing and more killing can be traced to previous leaders' reluctance to consider the results of their actions. This time, do you think our military action and the arming of militants will have a different outcome?
Today, on the thirteenth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, it is clear to me that the cowardice evinced by the president is directly proportional to the never-ending 9/11 fear mongering that continues to paralyze and retard this country.
Like the vast bulk of the rest of U.S. mass media, when push comes to militaristic shove, the New York Times refuses to make a break from the madness of perpetual war. In fact, with rare exceptions, the dominant media outlets end up fueling that madness.
When a government, in a blanket sense, views its citizens as potential or suspected criminals, or enemies of the state as the growth of Boston-like domestic terrorism may portend, then it is in a perpetual state of conflict with its own people.