perseverance

Parents shouldn't hide their hard work from their children.
If a child has run out of ideas, giving them some kind of challenge can prompt them to continue to amuse themselves imaginatively
These days, a lot of people have been talking about grit. What it is, why it's good, and how to get it. The news is filled with stories of personal achievement driven by sheer determination and the will to win. Angela Duckworth's Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance argues that grit is often a more effective attribute in achieving goals than talent or IQ.
At the same time, true grit--persistence and passion--is clearly something we want both for our kids and for ourselves. Fortunately, the life-skills that make us gritty can be learned and practiced.
If I had to pick one trait that is key to achieving nearly anything in life it is this. Perseverance. That's it. It's the one thing that sets achievers apart from those who complain that they aren't reaching their dreams.
Since about 90 percent of our football staff is new to UCF in the past eight months, it seemed like an appropriate time to
American business is fast paced, entrepreneurial and built on rugged individualism. While many nations have business cultures that run away from risk and avoid 'breaking new ground' at all costs, US business seeks them out almost like a moth is drawn to light.
During a muggy and humid weekend in the City of Brotherly Love, Harold Rasul sought a chance for himself, his coaching staff and student-athletes from East Cleveland's Shaw High School.
Guess what... you don't always get what you want. I know it seems hard to believe, but life is sometimes unfair.
Clearly the idea that grit is one of the keys to success has grabbed our curiosity. After all as Angela herself writes in the book after asking three hundred American adults to tell her how they felt about their grit scores: "In the entire sample, there wasn't a single person, who upon reflection, aspired to be less gritty."