pete peterson

Accurately and insightfully, Stronger Together points out that the debate over Social Security is distorted by "years of mythmaking, claiming we cannot afford Social Security and that the only solution is to cut the benefits on which 90 percent of American seniors rely."
The Obama budget could have reassured the American people that the monies they contribute to Social Security are properly handled, protected for their intended purpose of paying earned benefits and related administrative costs. Unfortunately, the just-released budget reinforces the opposite view.
Congress is back in session and corporate America’s favorite excuse is back in action.
Despite Obama's slumping popularity, all that remains in question is the final margin of victory, the outcome of key initiatives important to Brown's future plans, the size of Democratic majorities in the state Senate and Assembly, and whether there will be another Democratic sweep of all statewide offices.
In addition to the suggestion that Nunn adopt corporate America's priorities, the memo lists as advisers on issues like tax
American deficit hawks gathered in the nation's capital on Wednesday to commiserate over the collapse of the U.S. austerity movement, solemnly hobnobbing with political royalty to reminisce about the days when slashing Social Security seemed all but inevitable.
This policy shadow-boxing -- emphasizing the deficit while pursuing a separate agenda -- is illuminated by the fact that
In the absence of big initiative battles or high-profile, big money candidates slugging it out, we are left with, what we are left with. Primarily, that's the question of which little known Republican will emerge from the open primary into the November run-off with Governor Jerry Brown.
Right-wing billionaires threw a hissy fit in recent weeks. The 99 percent are persecuting them, the wealthy ones whined. That whole Occupy Wall Street thing hurt their feelings, conservative 1 percenters pouted.
It's as if Pete Peterson and his anti-entitlement crowd got control of Netflix and used its streaming power to create a fictional universe where elite interests not only win, but are widely popular.
Yet even as the parties and candidates grow increasingly reliant on donations from the super-rich, so too are the super-rich
As the government shutdown marches on and the dangerously real deadline of the federal debt limit approaches, it is increasingly clear that the fight over "Obamacare" is merely an opening salvo.
Even among the few thousand members of the power elite, there are a small number whose influence is greater than the others. Here is a list of the 20 most influential members of the power elite.
Fix the Debt is the most recent incarnation of the Pete Peterson machine seeking imposition of austerity on the masses, ostensibly to address economic downturn.
If Lesley Stahl chose to leave the Peterson Board and disassociate herself with that group's agenda, she made the right decision. But opting for secrecy was the wrong choice.
Media touted the event without looking deeper. Clips the day after did the same. Nary a mention of Pete Peterson or his vicious austerity agenda which will slash government spending, kill jobs, condemn students to higher rates of debt and make it much harder for graduates to succeed.
The event was organized through a local dance group, and participants received a $65 stipend. Individuals -- many of them
If you're a jobless person looking for food or a wounded vet who needs health care, 60 Minutes has a solution: Beg a billionaire for it.