pete peterson

Accurately and insightfully, Stronger Together points out that the debate over Social Security is distorted by "years of mythmaking, claiming we cannot afford Social Security and that the only solution is to cut the benefits on which 90 percent of American seniors rely."
The Obama budget could have reassured the American people that the monies they contribute to Social Security are properly handled, protected for their intended purpose of paying earned benefits and related administrative costs. Unfortunately, the just-released budget reinforces the opposite view.
Congress is back in session and corporate America’s favorite excuse is back in action.
Despite Obama's slumping popularity, all that remains in question is the final margin of victory, the outcome of key initiatives important to Brown's future plans, the size of Democratic majorities in the state Senate and Assembly, and whether there will be another Democratic sweep of all statewide offices.
"Experience to date indicates that ... the candidate is not comfortable with this practice and therefore, the campaign should
American deficit hawks gathered in the nation's capital on Wednesday to commiserate over the collapse of the U.S. austerity movement, solemnly hobnobbing with political royalty to reminisce about the days when slashing Social Security seemed all but inevitable.
This policy shadow-boxing -- emphasizing the deficit while pursuing a separate agenda -- is illuminated by the fact that
In the absence of big initiative battles or high-profile, big money candidates slugging it out, we are left with, what we are left with. Primarily, that's the question of which little known Republican will emerge from the open primary into the November run-off with Governor Jerry Brown.
Right-wing billionaires threw a hissy fit in recent weeks. The 99 percent are persecuting them, the wealthy ones whined. That whole Occupy Wall Street thing hurt their feelings, conservative 1 percenters pouted.