peter Diamandis

Novus Summit is focused on promoting science, innovation, and technology to transform the world in order to achieve the 17 UN Global Goals.
Earlier in the day, the three honorees of the Hellenic Post series, "Distinguished Personalities," took part in a press conference where a video was presented outlining their achievements and where they were presented with the their new stamps that were officially released to the public on September 1st.
Be so good that they can't ignore you. I started from the very bottom--trying to connect with talented people and learn from
Marnie's Wish list: #1 Personal wish: I've got an 11-year-old. I just hope the world, you know, is a place she can navigate
Twenty-six years ago, Marty McFly and Doc Brown climbed into their time-traveling flying DeLorean and set the controls to the distant future -- October 21, 2015 -- which happens to be today.
The future looks incredible because we are finally reaching the unique point in history when our needs are met by technology and we can start focusing on our passions, on what we most value in life, and also when we are empowered by technology to change the world for the better.
Big businesses and the private sector are undergoing a major overhaul as we all need to consider the impacts of our current rates of consumption, manufacturing processes, and sourcing of raw materials to sustain our future existence.
California's state of mind, as much as its magnificent landscape, has always loomed large in the global imagination. And just when many were beginning to believe that the future of the Golden State had passed it by, California is breaking new ground again on many fronts.
Diamandis: Today, the world of biology, which gives us our medicines and our foods, is based on the processes of nature over
As a species, we face a range of challenges that pose threats to our survival. When we analyze the fall of major civilizations of the past it was not war but more often environmental and resource implosion which did them in.
But today, the exact opposite is happening. This article was co-written with Ken Goffman. Used to be, folks were way too
Just as an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs and made way for small, furry mammals, a new wave of planetary disruptions is about to occur. The new asteroid is called "exponential technology." It is going to wipe out industries in a similar manner to the rock that fell to Earth during the Cretaceous. That is the premise of a new book by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler.
I find myself on a quest to learn how bilingualism might become the norm in America rather than the exception. That is, how most Americans might speak English plus another language of their choice. It seems clear that technology will play a role in accomplishing that transformation.
The World Business Forum New York is a fantastic event. Gathering of thinkers and doers from all over the world, it is the pulse of business; it captures -and sets-- the business trends.
The average organization resists innovation like a body's immune system resists disease. A company is made up of individuals, and each one has a chance to quash challenging new ideas. That's the safe move.
Clinton had a more immediate concern: How to feed all these newly techno-literate children in developing countries? Especially
The writing is clearly on the wall about what lies ahead. Yet even the most brilliant economists -- and futurists -- don't know what to do about it.
A hundred years ago, child birth was risky and infant mortality rates were horrific. How would you feel if 30 percent of infants died? Or if 900 expectant mothers out of every 100,000 died giving birth? But thanks to technology, the reality today is far different.