Peter Dreier

Thirty-one refugees have been dispatched on the 7-hour trip.
Who are the young radicals and reformers among us now whose names may not be well-known to the general public, but whose activism is leading the country in a more progressive direction?
JPMorgan Chase will reportedly pay $13 billion to settle civil charges around its alleged manipulation of mortgage securities -- a series of shady business deals that five years ago crippled homeowners and helped trigger the meltdown that threatened the world's economy. And that's just the tip of a REALLY big iceberg.
On this week's Moyers & Company, historian and author Peter Dreier tells us that the current political crisis is fraught with possibility for progressives in America -- and shares the reasons he continues to be optimistic.
What would have happened if, when Occupy Wall Streeters had taken over Zuccotti Square and the OWS leaders went beyond direct action and pressured Obama to support their cause with specific demands?
Teddy Roosevelt carried out imperialist wars, FDR imprisoned Japanese-American civilians in internment camps, and Lyndon Johnson expanded and intensified the Vietnam War. These men can claim valuable achievements, but how do their unjust misdeeds figure in?
What characteristics make a city more or less business friendly? Is it simply low tax rates and minimal regulation? The Los Angeles County Business Federation would say yes.
The attack on ACORN isn't about fighting corruption. If it was, then dozens of corporations with federal contracts far larger than ACORN's would be under investigation now.
It does seem like the August doldrums are renewing the progressive appetite for pushing Obama -- even the House Progressive Caucus is starting to channel its inner Evan Bayh and actually threaten to withhold votes.