petitions

Unless you live on a desert island with a volleyball named Wilson, you've probably seen more than a few political petitions in the wake of the 2016 election. The issues are as various as the people circulating them, which is why I began to wonder: Are they safe?
Keyser: "It was an interesting week. It wasn't too dramatic for us. We had double- and triple-checked our petition process
We couldn't help but cringe when two separate petitions with a combined 320,000 signatures demanded that the White House
But what are we supposed to do with all these highways and parks that suddenly need new names? Well, maybe... just maybe
From We the People: "Urge Sony pictures to release the film 'The Interview' and protect our 1st Amendment." For those who
How can those of us who feel like global citizens already -- which is not everyone, granted -- begin to act like global citizens?
Unfortunately for food companies, the Internet genie is out of the bottle and there's no turning back. So instead of commissioning studies that demonize the Internet, social media and/or "moms with food fears," food companies should take to heart the one simple lesson to be gleaned from the many recent successes in Internet food activism: Consumers want transparency.
Do you hate those knocks on the door with people holding clipboards? Have you thought of running for office but don't want to be the next Avon lady?
Sitting in our inboxes and on our desks are two piles of petitions we've received as university presidents. One pile consists of petitions we are being asked to sign; the other contains those telling us what we should or should not do.