Pharmaceuticals and Drug Trials

Scientists are developing drugs to stop the coronavirus. Here's what's promising and what isn't, from plasma or antibody infusions to hydroxychloroquine and more.
While Trump continues to push the antimalarial medication for coronavirus prevention, doctors fear that Americans will listen.
Experts involved in the Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine trial – and a participant – explain how it works.
FROM HUFFPOST U.K.
The Department of Veterans Affairs said Friday that it will not halt use of hydroxychloroquine on patients with the coronavirus but said fewer of its patients are now taking it.
Many health experts say there is no proof that hydroxychloroquine is safe and effective for treating COVID-19.
The FDA said it was aware of increased use of the medicines hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine through outpatient prescriptions.
The president suggested there's nothing to lose by trying an anti-malarial drug for COVID-19. Doctors say you could lose your life.
Pharmacists told ProPublica that they are seeing unusual and fraudulent prescribing activity as doctors stockpile unproven coronavirus drugs endorsed by President Donald Trump.
The president, who is not a doctor, recommended a potentially dangerous drug combo to his 74 million Twitter followers. "What do we have to lose?" he asked.
It's the latest evidence that the president’s focus is on public relations, not managing a worsening catastrophe.